Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm doing a switch case where the case values need to be in binary digits like 01,010,0100,0,00,000, and so on.

switch(Code)
{
          case 0:
               {
                   printf("A");
                   break;
                   }
          case 00:
               {
                   printf("B");
                   break;
                   }
          case 000:
               {
                   printf("C");
                   break;
}

I know that if I input 000, it it will be stored as 0. My question is how do you input 000 so that I can get printf("C")

share|improve this question
    
You're missing a closing }. –  meagar Aug 10 '12 at 15:23
2  
The values 0, 00 and 000 all are binary for 0 so there is no way around. (Also note, that in fact those are octal values in the program, because they all start with 0). –  Nobody Aug 10 '12 at 15:23
1  
You haven't mentioned how you're receiving the input. I'm assuming it's user input. Store that in a string. Change your switch - case to an if - else if construct and use strcmp to compare strings. –  Praetorian Aug 10 '12 at 15:23
1  
How can you differentiate 0 from 000, even in binary? –  Dan F Aug 10 '12 at 15:23
2  
Zero it zero. It doesn't matter how many zeros there are, they're all equal to zero. If you want to store multiple zeros, you need to store them as a string. Your question therefore is unanswerable, as the only response to "How can I do this?" is "You can't". –  meagar Aug 10 '12 at 15:24

3 Answers 3

I can't imagine why you would want to distinguish between these numbers, as in any representation they are the same number, but I guess you will have to examine them as strings. You can't put strings into a switch statement in C, so you will just have to have a sequence of if/else statements:

void selectString(char *input)
{
    if(strcmp(input, "0") == 0)
    {
        printf("A");
    }
    else if(strcmp(input, "00") == 0)
    {
        printf("B");
    }
    else if(strcmp(input, "000") == 0)
    {
        printf("C");
    }
}

Having said this, what you are asking appears very much like an XY problem, that is, you are asking how to do weird thing Y because you think you need to do it to solve X. What are you trying to do?

share|improve this answer
    
The question states specifically to use a switch case. It wants to convert morse code(zeros instead of commas) to letters. –  user1590624 Aug 10 '12 at 15:51
    
So it is an XY problem. If you want a switch, you have to parse the input into a form amenable to that. In what form are you getting your input? –  Daniel Fischer Aug 10 '12 at 15:57
    
It is user input. Based on table of values, the corresponding letters for each morse code is to be found –  user1590624 Aug 10 '12 at 15:59
    
I meant "what symbols are used", is it 0 for dot, 1 for dash? –  Daniel Fischer Aug 10 '12 at 16:04
2  
So your problem is in the encoding. Morse code is short and long beeps representing 0's and 1's. But you don't know when a value starts. I would recommend prefixing each series of input with a 1 start bit. Then your values are 10, 100, and 1000. You can easily compare these in binary representation. –  Josh Petitt Aug 10 '12 at 16:05

Your problem is you have a series of bits that you are trying to decode (signal on the wire). But you don't know when your packet of information starts. What you are missing in the encoding is the start of a letter. (You also don't have start of word, I'd recommend making up an unused number to represent a space between words).

In your program would recommend prefixing each series of bits with a 1 start bit (note this is not actually transmitted but implied because of the time duration of nothing being transmitted). Then your values are 10, 100, and 1000. You can easily compare these in binary representation. Note the smallest valid series of bits is then the letter 'e' which would be 10 in binary. A single 1 bit is not a valid value. Just from glancing at the Morse code entry here it would appear that the alphabet forms a numbering system that could be stored in a lookup table for a fast implementation.

share|improve this answer
    
Could you give me an example on how to do so? Thank you –  user1590624 Aug 10 '12 at 16:51
    
    
I don't know how you are getting input into your program, so it is hard to suggest anything specific. What have you tried so far? –  Josh Petitt Aug 10 '12 at 18:27
    
unsigned int Code; printf("Please Enter Morse Code:"); scanf("%o", &Code); switch(Code) –  user1590624 Aug 11 '12 at 4:29
    
int value = 1; while(int c = getc()) { value <<= 1; if (c == '1') value += 1;} –  Josh Petitt Aug 11 '12 at 23:28

Given you're using this for Morse (I'm guessing 0 = Dot, 1 = dash) in your variable. "Code" Must be a String.

switch(Code)
{
    case "01":   //".-"
        printf("A");
        break;
    case "100":   //"-.."
        printf("B");
        break;
    case "0001":   //"...-"
        printf("V");
    break;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.