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I recently got into an argument over how switch handles comparisons, and need help settling it.

If I write a switch such as:

switch ($x){
    case ($x > 5):
        echo "foo";
        break;
    case ($x < 5):
        echo "bar";
        break;
    default:
        echo "five";
        break;
}

Which if statement is it equivalent to? A or B?

// A

if ($x > 5) {
    echo "foo";
} elseif ($x < 5) {
    echo "bar";
} else {
    echo "five";
}

// B

if ($x == ($x > 5)) {
    echo "foo";
} elseif ($x == ($x < 5)) {
    echo "bar";
} else {
    echo "five";
}
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

To everyone, let me clarify:

It is equivalent to B.

It is not "both", it is not sometimes its one, sometimes it is the other, it is always B. To understand why you sometimes see results that indicate that it might be A, you need to understand how type coercion works in PHP.

If you pass in a falsey value to the "argument" of switch and you use expressions in your cases that result in a boolean value, they will only match if your expression evaluates to FALSE.


switch is basically a huge if/elseif tree that performs loose comparisons (== instead of ===) between the value passed to switch (the left side of the expression) and the expression in the cases (the right side).

This can be proved quite nicely with a variation on your code:

$x = 0;

switch ($x) {
  case $x > -1: // This is TRUE, but 0 == FALSE so this won't match
    echo "case 1";
  case $x == -1: // This is FALSE, and 0 == FALSE so this will match
    echo "case 2";
}

And if we convert that to the two if/elseif trees:

A:

$x = 0;

if ($x > -1) {
  // It matches here
  echo "case 1";
} else if ($x == -1) {
  // and not here
  echo "case 2";
}

B:

$x = 0;

if ($x == ($x > -1)) {
  // It doesn't match here
  echo "case 1";
} else if ($x == ($x == -1)) {
  // ..but here instead
  echo "case 2";
}
share|improve this answer

Your example is equivalent to B.

If you want to use comparison into your switch (and be equivalent to A), you could write this:

switch (true) { // Use true instead of $x
    case ($x > 5):
        echo "foo";
        break;
    case ($x < 5):
        echo "bar";
        break;
    default:
        echo "five";
        break;
}
share|improve this answer
    
So you're saying that the above code would be equivalent to A? –  Matt Aug 10 '12 at 15:34
    
Yes, that's what I mean. –  Florent Aug 10 '12 at 15:35

That switch case is equivalent to B

Edit :

If we take for example that $x is equal to 0 :

$x > 5 will evaluate to false (and 0 evaluates to false too), so the first if will print bar, but the second one will print foo. The switch will be transformed to something like this :

switch ($x){
    case false:
        echo "foo";
        break;
    case true:
        echo "bar";
        break;
    default:
        echo "five";
        break;
}

and that will print foo (same as B)

Edit 2 :

I tried it so that gave me :

with $x = 0 => switch (foo), if A (bar), if B (foo)

with $x = 5 => switch (five), if A (five), if B (five)

with $x = 7 => switch (foo), if A (foo), if B (foo)

share|improve this answer
    
I know that it's B, but I need more of an explanation than this to settle the argument. Some of the "comments" in the documentation indicate that it might be A. –  Matt Aug 10 '12 at 15:30
1  
I edited the answer –  Oussama Aug 10 '12 at 15:36

I was first post with "The answer is B", but SO didn't accept it because "body must be at least 30 characters; you entered 15".

Here's the proof, using PHP 5.4.0:

<?php

<?php

function test($x) {
    echo "Switch: ";

    switch ($x){
        case ($x > 5):
            echo "foo";
            break;
        case ($x < 5):
            echo "bar";
            break;
        default:
            echo "five";
            break;
    }

    echo "\nA: ";

    if ($x > 5) {
        echo "foo";
    } elseif ($x < 5) {
        echo "bar";
    } else {
        echo "five";
    }

    echo "\nB: ";

    // B

    if ($x == ($x > 5)) {
        echo "foo";
    } elseif ($x == ($x < 5)) {
        echo "bar";
    } else {
        echo "five";
    }
}

echo "Test with 6:\n\n";
test(6);
echo "\n\nTest with 4:\n\n";
test(4);
echo "\n\nTest with 5:\n\n";
test(5);
echo "\n\nTest with true:\n\n";
test(true);
echo "\n\nTest with false:\n\n";
test(false);
echo "\n\n";

produces this output:

    Test with 6:

Switch: foo
A: foo
B: foo

Test with 4:

Switch: bar
A: bar
B: bar

Test with 5:

Switch: five
A: five
B: five

Test with true:

Switch: five
A: five
B: five

Test with false:

Switch: foo
A: bar
B: foo
share|improve this answer
    
How could $x == ($x > 5) evaluate to true where $x == 6? –  Matt Aug 10 '12 at 15:39
2  
Sorry, but this is not correct. Check test(0) to see when it's different. The reason for this is that $x == ($x > 5) tests if $x == true, which it will evaluate as true as long as $x is not 0. ... and now my comment seems misplaced as you removed "they're identical". –  MatsLindh Aug 10 '12 at 15:41
    
To answer my own question above, @fiskfisk makes a great point that $x == true evaluates to true because 6 is truthy. –  Matt Aug 10 '12 at 15:52

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