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Consider the following Excel worksheet:

   | A       B     C
 --+--------------------
 1 | company day  return
 --+--------------------
 2 | 1       1    2
 3 | 1       2    1
 4 | 1       3    1
 5 | 2       1    3
 6 | 2       2    2
 7 | 2       3    0
 8 | 3       1    1
 9 | 3       2    5
10 | 3       3    1

The worksheet is panel timeseries basically. In the example, it lists the stock returns for 3 companyies for 3 conseutive days. I now want to graph the total return (so: accumulated return for all companies) per day, as follows:

 return 8 |        * (C3+C6+C9=1+2+5=8)
        7 |
        6 |  * (C2+C5+C8=2+3+1=6)
        5 |
        4 |
        3 |
        2 |              * (C4+C7+C10=1+0+1=2)
        1 |
        0 +----------------------
             1     2     3    day

Is this possible to do in Excel and if so, how?

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Does the chart need to be based on that exact range? Or could you reference another range based on those cells? –  RocketDonkey Aug 10 '12 at 15:37
    
I don't understand your question. Do you mean the size of the actual dataset? Because in reality, there are 100 companies (not 3), and for each company 147 days of returns (not 3). So the chart would have an x-axis ranging from 1 to 100. –  Pr0no Aug 10 '12 at 15:43
1  
Ha, yeah that wasn't a very well-worded question. See my answer below (and @Gimp's as well) - we are both referring to sheet that is separate from your original data since it makes it easier to set up the data in the way you want. –  RocketDonkey Aug 10 '12 at 16:12
    
That's OK. You both have been very helpful. Thanks :-) –  Pr0no Aug 10 '12 at 16:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Setup a new chart graph on another sheet to group the data from your first larger chart into this format:

 --+--------------------
A1 | company1 company2 Company3
 --+--------------------
 1 | B2       C2    D2
 2 | B3       C3    D3
 3 | B4       C4    C4

Then, set the formula in cell B2 to something like = SUMIFS(C:C,A:A,A1,B:B,A2) Where C:C, B:B and A:A reference the columns in the original graph and the A1 and A2 Reference the grouping chart.

Note that the SUMIFS formula is for Excel 2007 / 2010. I've included example worksheets for this method and using the same approach with an Array formula in older versions of excel.

Here is an example file for Excel version 2007 / 2010: https://dl.dropbox.com/u/19599049/GroupData_NewExcel.xlsx

Here is an example for old versions of excel:
https://dl.dropbox.com/u/19599049/GroupData_OldExcel.xls

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, but how would I do that automatically? I have never used formulas before when selecting the range of a chart... –  Pr0no Aug 10 '12 at 15:45
    
he is talking about making a new range, and then using that to make the chart –  Ross Larson Aug 10 '12 at 15:59
    
Thanks @RossLarson I've updated my answer to be clearer. –  Gimp Aug 10 '12 at 16:01

As @Gimp suggests, how about setting up a new table on a new sheet that refers to your original range (OriginalSheet in this case), and have it look like:

  |   A      B       C
--+---------------------
1 | day   return
--+---------------------
2 | 1     6
3 | 2     8
4 | 3     2

Where return in B2 would be calculated as

=SUMIFS(OriginalSheet!C:C,OriginalSheet!B:B,"=" & A2)

and copied all the way down. To set it up, you would want to just list the days in column A and then add the formula. From that, you can set up a scatter plot by selecting the entire new range (in our example, A1:B4. The resulting chart will look like what you provided. Additionally, this will keep the number of columns low, so adding new companies will not widen the range.

Let me know if that doesn't make sense as I don't have a gift for communicating clearly :)

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