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Finally here is the edit:

I am synchronizing two different processes with a semaphore:

var semaphore = new Semaphore(0, 1, "semName");

so I have process A and process B they happen to be different executables.

Process A

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {

        Console.Write("Process A");
        Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
        {
            var semaphoreName = "sem";
            var semaphore = Semaphore.OpenExisting(semaphoreName);

            Thread.Sleep(100);

            semaphore.Release();

            semaphore.WaitOne();

            semaphore.Release();

            Console.Write("Process A Completed!");
        });
        Console.Read();

    }

Process B (Different console app)

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Console.Write("Process B");
        Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
        {
            var semaphoreName = "sem";
            var semaphore = new Semaphore(0, 1, semaphoreName);

            semaphore.WaitOne();

            Thread.Sleep(1000);

            semaphore.Release();

            semaphore.WaitOne();

            Console.Write("Process B Completed!");
        });

        Console.Read();


    }

If I debug the processes or place a Thread.Sleep I am able to reach the last line Console.Write("Process A Completed!"); How can I solve this problem without having to place Thread.Sleep(100);?




Edit

There is no race condition!! Maybe I am wrong correct me if I am. Anyways here is the reason why I think there is no race condition:

Process A

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Console.Write("Process A");
        var semaphoreName = "sem";

        Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
        {                                
            var semaphore = Semaphore.OpenExisting(semaphoreName);

            semaphore.Release();

            semaphore.WaitOne();

            // this line should never be reached but it is!!!

            Console.Write("Process A Completed!");
        });            

        Console.Read();

    }

Processes B

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Console.Write("Process B");
        var semaphoreName = "sem";

        Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
        {                

            var semaphore = new Semaphore(0, 1, semaphoreName);

            semaphore.WaitOne();

            // important to have these lines
            int a = 0;
            for (var i = 0; i < 1000000000; i++)
                a = i;

            Thread.Sleep(10000); // there should not be a race condition any more!!!!

            Console.Write("Process B Completed!");
        });

        Console.Read();
    }

note that on process A we should never reach the line: Console.Write("Process A Completed!"); But we do...

Process B sleeps for 10000 seconds so there is no reason why there should be a race condition. Moreover if I remove the loop for (var i = 0; i < 1000000000; i++) I don't get that behavior.

share|improve this question
2  
Use two semaphores.. –  Martin James Aug 10 '12 at 15:49
    
See bluebytesoftware.com/blog/… for an explanation of changes starting in Vista of Windows' fairness policy for synchronization objects. –  Michael Burr Aug 10 '12 at 16:12
    
I guess I will use to semaphores that will be eassier... –  Tono Nam Aug 10 '12 at 16:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I haven't been able to find any documentation that states that threads waiting on a semaphore will necessarily be released in the same order that they begin waiting on it. Is it not therefore possible that the sem.WaitOne() in process B is being released by the sem.Release() immediately above it, without giving process A a chance to enter?

The addition of the Thread.Sleep() prior to waiting on the semaphore in process B presumably gives process A a chance to enter the semaphore instead.

You've not made it entirely clear why you're using a semaphore in this way, or what the sem.WaitOne() in process B is waiting for (since process A never releases the semaphore in your example code), so it's difficult to suggest an improvement that fix the problem.

If however you're intending to have process A wait for process B to start before beginning its work, then for process B to wait for process A to complete the work before continuing, it seems that two ManualResetEvents could achieve this more effectively (specifically a "Process B ready" event waited on by process A, and a "Process A finished" event waited on by process B).

Possible solution:

Process A:

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Console.Write("Process A");
        Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
        {
            var readyEvent = new EventWaitHandle(false, EventResetMode.ManualReset, "Process B Ready");
            var doneEvent = new EventWaitHandle(false, EventResetMode.ManualReset, "Process A Finished");

            // Wait for process B to be ready...
            readyEvent.WaitOne();

            // Do some work...

            Console.Write("Process A Completed!");

            // Signal that the process is complete
            doneEvent.Set();
        });
        Console.Read();
    }

Process B:

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Console.Write("Process B");
        Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
        {
            var readyEvent = new EventWaitHandle(false, EventResetMode.ManualReset, "Process B Ready");
            var doneEvent = new EventWaitHandle(false, EventResetMode.ManualReset, "Process A Finished");

            // Signal that process B is ready
            readyEvent.Set();

            // Wait for process A to complete...
            doneEvent.WaitOne();

            Console.Write("Process B Completed!");
        });

        Console.Read();
    }
share|improve this answer

Currently Process B doesn't consume the semaphore before releasing it. OpenExisting doesn't consume a count according to the documentation. WaitOne will increment the semaphore count if there is available space.

So assuming you run A first because it contains new Semaphore and B second because it contains OpenExisting, A will grab it and sleep for 4 seconds and never release it, and B will try to release it before grabbing it.

As for WaitOne not waiting, it seems to me to be a race condition with the other process. The 10ms allows the other process to get in first, hence WaitOne in the second process appears to wait because there is no space.

Semaphores only block when there is no space, if there is space WaitOne will return very quickly.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks a lot for the help. Take a look at my edit. I do not have a race condition... –  Tono Nam Aug 10 '12 at 16:31

As a general answer to your specific question you have, as other have pointed out, a race condition in your code.

This is what's actually happening most of the time and why you see it as systematic (when in fact is random).

You start your threads:

  • A starts and gets blocked in the semaphore.
  • B starts and releases the lock on the semaphore.

Now the scenario diverges:

If you have the Thread.Sleep(100) but not with Thread.Sleep(10), the internal implementation of .NET will suspend your thread and start the process A, since its the one that's been waiting for the semaphore the longest.

If you have the Thread.Sleep(10) probably (I don't know for sure) the process just spins for 10 milliseconds and continues without doing a context change (that is, without actually putting the thread to sleep), the it goes on to reacquire the semaphore and thus the process A never gets unlocked. The same happens of course if you don't have any kind of thread.sleep. Basically, with your Thread.Sleep(100) you're forcing a context switch and thus allowing the process A to acquire the thread. That's of course totally random as that context switch could come in anyway but that way you force it and that's why you see the results that you mention.

Edit: For your updated question you're thinking it wrong. You use semaphores (a mutex in this case) for synchronizing two processes or threads. So you make one of the threads acquire the semaphore and the other thread release the semaphore, that way the second thread is "signaling" the first one that it can continue.

If you want the process to work both ways you have to use two semaphores.

share|improve this answer
    
It's unlikely that an OS would waste so much CPU on a spin for 10ms - two context changes is much quicker than that. It would probably round it up/down to schedule it again at the next timer interrupt, or perhaps the one after that. –  Martin James Aug 10 '12 at 16:24

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