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Hi I have an n by n matrix, z, which denotes the scalar values in the z dimension of a vector field. i.e.

z = 1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 1
    1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 1
    1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 1
    1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 1
    1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 1

the scalar field values in the x and y dimensions are 0. My question is how do I take z and form the vector field. I have tried something like:

x = zeros(size(z));
y = x;
vecfield = [x(:) y(:) z(:)]

where I would be expecting:

vecfield(:,:1) = 

    0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
    0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
    0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
    0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
    0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 

 vecfield(:,:2) = 

    0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
    0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
    0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
    0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
    0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 

 vecfield(:,:3) = 

    1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 1
    1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 1
    1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 1
    1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 1
    1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 1

However I am getting:

vecfield = 

    0 0 1
    0 0 2
    0 0 3
    0 0 4
    . . .
    . . .

and so on. Where am I going wrong here?

Thanks

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It's worth pointing out that the expression x(:) does not return the array x, it returns a vector containing the elements of x in storage order. Try this at the command line. –  High Performance Mark Aug 10 '12 at 16:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem is that your trying to create 3 separate n by n matrixes and are forcing them into the wrong dimensions. Instead,

vecfield = zeros(size(z),length(z),3) %because you want three arrays in the z direction

then, vecfield(:,:,3) = z;

OR you are trying to take the scalar values of Z and use them as an indicator of z-dimension size of the vecfield. This is impossible because the dimensions settings would not be uniform. However, you can still represent that information by numbering the cells that are in your vecfield and making everything else zero. Then it would look like...

vecfield(:,:,1)

1 2 3 2 1

1 2 3 2 1

1 2 3 2 1

then, vecfield(:,:,2)

0 1 2 1 0

0 1 2 1 0

0 1 2 1 0

then, vecfield(:,:,3)

0 0 1 0 0

0 0 1 0 0

0 0 1 0 0

etc

We can do that (the idea of it, obviously using your n by n dimensions). something like this maybe,

vecfield = zeros(size(z),length(z),max(max(z)));
for n  = 1 : size(vecfield,3)
     vecfield(:,:,n) = z(:,:)- n;
     vecfield((vecfield(:,:,n) < 0)==1) = 0;
end

hope that helped!

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wanted to avoid a for loop if possible, but this gets the right answer. –  brucezepplin Aug 12 '12 at 15:12

Try this

vecfield = cat(3, x,y,z)

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No need to create x and y explicitly:

z = [1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 1;
    1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 1;
    1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 1;
    1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 1;
    1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 1];

vecfield = z; % vecfield 5 x 9 (x 1)
vecfield(:,:,2:3) = 0; 

The last command dynamically extends vecfield to the third dimension, sets all values to zero.

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