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I am trying to overload an MVC Action, but since "overloading" does not work for route actions (error 500 says ambiguous method I guess because parameters cannot be strongly typed from the browser), then I thought I would just return one action to another since I cannot use RedirectToAction for HttpPost either. The issue is that it is trying to find a view with the new action name instead of what aciton I am trying to call. Here is what I am trying to do:

    [HttpPost]
    public ActionResult DetailForProductID(int productID)
    {
        return Detail(new[] { GetProductById(productID) });
    }

    [HttpPost]
    public ActionResult Detail(IEnumerable<Product> products)
    {
       ....
       return View(productViewModel);
    }

This is the error I get though:

The view 'DetailForProductID' or its master was not found or no view engine supports the searched locations. The following locations were searched:
~/Views/Products/DetailForProductID.aspx
~/Views/Products/DetailForProductID.ascx
~/Views/Shared/DetailForProductID.aspx
~/Views/Shared/DetailForProductID.ascx
~/Views/Products/DetailForProductID.cshtml
~/Views/Products/DetailForProductID.vbhtml
~/Views/Shared/DetailForProductID.cshtml
~/Views/Shared/DetailForProductID.vbhtml

What is the most robust and elegant way to handle this? I would not want to store things in temporary sessions or do a RedirectToAction becase I should be able to do everything server-side. Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
Why do you use POST for a method accepting an ID parameter (DetailForProductID)? As it is, it seems GET is more appropriate. I still think RedirectToAction is the best choice. – twoflower Aug 10 '12 at 16:18
    
@twoflower In an MvcController, would you consider GET to be the correct method if those controller actions are used with e.g. $.post from jQuery? – Anders Holmström Aug 10 '12 at 16:20
1  
@AndersHolmström No. But an action method with the signature DetailForProductID(int productID) does not look like one to be used with $.post. It looks like an action to GET the details of a specified product. – twoflower Aug 10 '12 at 16:23
    
@twoflower You are probably correct. Think I'm just confusing myself a bit. :) – Anders Holmström Aug 10 '12 at 16:25
    
Even if I changed it to GET, I still run into the same problem of calling the other action. – TruMan1 Aug 10 '12 at 19:44
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can also use Tempdata in this scenario, for example:

public ActionResult DetailForProductID(int productID)
{
    IEnumerable<Product> data =   GetProductById(productID);
    TempData["ProductData"]= data;
    return RedirectToAction("Detail",data);        
}


public ActionResult Detail(IEnumerable<Product> products)
{
   ....
    if(TempData["ProductData"]!=null){
       IEnumerable<Product> data =  (IEnumerable<Product>)TempData["ProductData"];
       return View(data);
    }else {
       return View(products);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

For redirecting like that, I would recommend the following:

return RedirectToAction("Detail", data);

But I am not sure why you have the need for this. Looking at your actions, why not do it like this instead?

public ActionResult Detail(int productId)
{
   var data = GetProductById(productID);
   ....
   return View(productViewModel);
}
share|improve this answer

I believe it is important to keep controllers "thin" and "dumb". Once you get beyond a simple website and need to build something more complex, you don't want to have to rewrite the same code multiple times (not good for many reasons). It will also become impossible to use the controllers as generic functions (which is basically what you are attempting to do now).

A more elegant and robust way to handle this would be to abstract away your application logic and perform it somewhere else. Then you could call pieces of the logic depending on the action's requirements. To start moving in that direction, you could write the controller specific logic in each controller, then determine what function is shared between both of them and place that somewhere else in your project. In more complex projects it is not unusual to have no application logic in the controller at all.

You might want to try to create one generic function that returns a "Product" probably by Id and place that function somewhere else. Then use the controller to determine the specific logic and call the shared function to get the product by Id.

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