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This may be a silly question, but given the following dict:

combination_dict = {"one": [1, 2, 3], "two": [2, 3, 4], "three": [3, 4, 5]}

How would I achieve this list:

result_list = [{"one": [1, 2, 3], "two": [2, 3, 4]}, {"one": [1, 2, 3], "three": [3, 4, 5]}, {"two": [2, 3, 4], "three": [3, 4, 5]}]

In other words, I want all combinations of two key/value pairs in a dict without replacement, irrespective of order.

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6  
Why is there no "two"/"three" in your result_list? –  Jolly Jumper Aug 10 '12 at 16:20
1  
Thanks for pointing that out! –  Andrew C Aug 10 '12 at 16:42
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4 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

One solution is to use itertools.combinations():

result_list = map(dict, itertools.combinations(
    combination_dict.iteritems(), 2))

Edit: Due to popular demand, here a Python 3.x version:

result_list = list(map(dict, itertools.combinations(
    combination_dict.items(), 2)))
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+1. Unless there's specifically a reason to do otherwise, I lean towards making code more portable between python 2 and 3. I'd use dict.items() unless there is a memory issue with. –  Joel Cornett Aug 10 '12 at 16:28
    
@JoelCornett If you are considering 3.x then you would also have to convert the map object to a list so it would be better to leave this as a note –  jamylak Aug 10 '12 at 16:29
3  
@JoelCornett: Yeah, fine. I guess if I had used items() instead of iteritems(), someone would have commented that this wastes memory. (Honestly, if the dictionary is that large that it is a problem to take a copy of pointers to all keys and values, you certainly don't want to create all combinations of two items, which uses O(n²) additional space.) –  Jolly Jumper Aug 10 '12 at 16:32
    
@jamylak: Good point. Well, I suppose it's all preference. –  Joel Cornett Aug 10 '12 at 16:38
    
@JollyJumper: You're right :p. All the same, it may be useful to include a 3.x version below your 2.x one, just for completeness. –  Joel Cornett Aug 10 '12 at 16:38
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I prefer the solution by @JollyJumper for readability although this one performs faster

>>> from itertools import combinations
>>> d = {"one": [1, 2, 3], "two": [2, 3, 4], "three": [3, 4, 5]}
>>> [{j: d[j] for j in i} for i in combinations(d, 2)]
[{'three': [3, 4, 5], 'two': [2, 3, 4]}, {'three': [3, 4, 5], 'one': [1, 2, 3]}, {'two': [2, 3, 4], 'one': [1, 2, 3]}]

Timings:

>python -m timeit -s "d = {'three': [3, 4, 5], 'two': [2, 3, 4], 'one': [1, 2, 3]}; from itertools import combinations" "map(dict, combinations(d.iteritems(), 2))"
100000 loops, best of 3: 3.27 usec per loop

>python -m timeit -s "d = {'three': [3, 4, 5], 'two': [2, 3, 4], 'one': [1, 2, 3]}; from itertools import combinations" "[{j: d[j] for j in i} for i in combinations(d, 2)]"
1000000 loops, best of 3: 1.92 usec per loop
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from itertools import combinations
combination_dict = {"one": [1, 2, 3], "two": [2, 3, 4], "three": [3, 4, 5]}
lis=[]
for i in range(1,len(combination_dict)):
    for x in combinations(combination_dict,i):
        dic={z:combination_dict[z] for z in x}
        lis.append(dic)
print lis            

output:

[{'three': [3, 4, 5]}, {'two': [2, 3, 4]}, {'one': [1, 2, 3]}, {'three': [3, 4, 5], 'two': [2, 3, 4]}, {'three': [3, 4, 5], 'one': [1, 2, 3]}, {'two': [2, 3, 4], 'one': [1, 2, 3]}]
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I believe this would get you what you need.

result list = [{combination_dict['one','two'],combination_dict['one','three']}]

I found this tutorial to be very helpful:

http://bdhacker.wordpress.com/2010/02/27/python-tutorial-dictionaries-key-value-pair-maps-basics/

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