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Hi I'm not sure how to ask this question I'v done quite a bit of looking and came up empty; so I must apologize if this has been gone over already. I'm working on my first c++ project and its been a lot of fun. I am getting a redefinition error when I compile my code. The project consist of 3 main files each with their own header file and one common header that they all use. I want my other files to have access to this class so I declared it in the common header. I wrote in guards so I thought this would avoid this error but it don't, and I do not understand why.

Here are the two header files in question.

menu.h


#ifndef MENU_H
#define MENU_H
#include "common.h"
class menu
{
   int x, y, iterations, time;
   void title(int maxX, int maxY);
   void titleSplash();
   void fall(bool, int&, int, int);

public:
menu();
void init();
int score;
void gameOver(int how);
void mainMenu();



};



#endif

common.h


#ifndef COMMON_H
#define COMMON_H
   //things that all files need
        #include <curses.h>
        #include <string.h>
        #include <cstring>
        #include <cstdlib> //for debugging
        #include <unistd.h>
        #include <iostream>


        //using namespace std;

        #ifdef _WIN32//are we running windows?

        #define _WIN32_WINNT 0x0600
        #define CLOCK 2//only used for the opening animaitons repalaces clock
        #define SLEEP(a) sleep(a);//in 1000s of a second
        #include "WIN32.h"
        #endif

        #ifndef _WIN32

        #define CLOCK 8
        #define SLEEP(a) usleep( a * 1000);//in 1 000 000s of a second// replaces CLOCK

        #endif

        #define TIMER 17 //for about 60 times a second rounding up form 16.666666

     #ifndef MAIN_H
        #ifndef NON_MAIN_COMMON
        #define NON_MAIN_COMMON

        //common things that i dont want to put in each header file




    #endif

#endif
//everything else if after here including everything common.cpp
//------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

//anything in myLib MUST be externed to avoid multiple definitions error
#ifndef MYLIB_H
extern void getStdScr();
extern int stdx, stdy, score;
extern WINDOW * win;
extern void ncursesInit();
extern void wrapper();
extern void newGame();
extern std::string keyPress();
extern void bclear(WINDOW * window);
#endif

#ifndef MENU_H
class menu
{
public:
menu();
void init();
int score;
void gameOver(int how);
void mainMenu();
};
#endif

//end of myLib


#endif
//EOCOMMON

I thought the guards in both the menu.h and common.h would prevent a redefinition of my menu class.

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1  
class shouldn't be in common.h. only in menu.h . and the externs only in mylib.h. and why are they externs? those arent global variablees –  Gir Aug 10 '12 at 17:03
    
Can't reproduce. Post a minimal complete example or we won't have a chance. –  Beta Aug 10 '12 at 17:15
    
If you have the same code in two different places they will get out of sync. Don't Repeat Yourself; this is one of the most fundamental rules of programming. –  Alan Stokes Aug 10 '12 at 19:27

2 Answers 2

It's not obvious why you are getting multiple definition errors from the code you've posted. But the answer is simple. Don't define class menu twice. I don't understand why you've done that. What benefit do you think it has? Just put it once in common.h or in menu.h and you should be OK.

You seem to have a misunderstanding of the role of header files when you say 'The project consist of 3 main files each with their own header file and one common header that they all use'. But everything that goes in header files is common code. That's what header files are for. So my choice would be to put class menu in menu.h and then include menu.h where ever you need it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your response, The reason why I have separate header files (or at least why I thought it was a good idea) was because I only wanted only some items to be visible to the other files –  superxkooda Aug 10 '12 at 17:58
1  
If you don't want something to be visible to another file then don't put it in a header file. It's perfectly OK to put a class definition (say) in cpp file is that's the only place you want to use it. Remember the point of header files is sharing between cpp files. –  jahhaj Aug 10 '12 at 18:03
    
This helps a lot I guess I have been misusing header files or at least approaching them wrong. I do have this project on a git its at github.com/superxkooda/Hello-the-game.git It's a silly little text based game using ncurses.I plan to make it somewhere along the lines of zork with mini games thrown in here and there. Thanks again it helps a lot. –  superxkooda Aug 10 '12 at 21:41

You're missing the #define MENU_H (and also #define MYLIB_H) from your common.h if you define a class multiple times, you need the whole guard each time, not just the #ifndef MENU_H part.

Also, instead of defining the menu class again, you should use #include "menu.h", and #include "mylib.h". It's NOT an error if 2 header both includes the other, only if both needs the other to be defined first, but that's clearly not the case.

PS: there is a #else, so instead of

#ifdef _WIN32
  // for windows
#endif
#ifndef _WIN32
  // for anything else
#endif

You can write:

#ifdef _WIN32
  // for windows
#else
  // for anything else
#endif
share|improve this answer
    
Two headers including each other is almost always a bad idea. –  Alan Stokes Aug 10 '12 at 19:29
    
I did not know that you could use an else there thank you I have implemented it now. –  superxkooda Aug 10 '12 at 21:32

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