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I'm creating a full-screen jQuery Dialog.

I'm creating a custom <div> to serve as the Dialog's header.

Inside of the <div> is a <table>. The <table> contains 1 <tr>, which contains 5 <td>s. Inside of each <div> are the actual contents to display in the Dialog's header.

I'm trying to display some jQuery button objects to allow for the user to edit any of the information in the header. I've attached a click event to the button and another click event to the header. Tapping on the button, calls the header's click event, but the button's click event never gets called.

Here's the dialog header click code:

$(dialog)
    .parent()
    .find('.ui-dialog-titlebar').click(
        function () {
            $(dialog).dialog('close').remove();
        }
    );

Here's the button creation code:

var editBtn = $('<button>');
editBtn
    .css('height', '2.2em')
    .css('float', 'right')
    .button(
        {
            text: false,
            icons:
                {
                    primary: 'ui-icon-pencil'
                }
        }
    )
    .on(
        'click',
        function () {
            alert('Edit clicked');
            EditClicked(this);
            return false;
        }
    );

Any idea how I can fix this?

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2 Answers 2

It could be the case that, with jQuery, you're selecting a <button> instead of button. I've never tried selecting html objects with the tags around it. Do your styles get added to the button? Also, use a hash for css:

.css({'height':'2.2em','float':'right'})

the height might get overridden if you call css twice.

Another tip use .closest('.ui-dialog-titlebar') instead of doing two method calls of .parent().find().

Cheers!

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Actually, I'm not selecting a <button>, but creating one. That's why I wrap it in <>. Also, I've not had any trouble with chaining .css() calls, and doing it that way helps me to visualize my code better. I'm looking into the .closest() tip. Thanks for that! –  mbm29414 Aug 10 '12 at 18:53
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.on is probably not what you want. Its purpose is to attach generic event handlers to any element matching a given selector inside a given element, no matter when they are created.

What you need instead is .bind() that attaches an event handler to a specific object.

So, this code should do the job:

var editBtn = $('<button>');
editBtn
    .css({
        'height': '2.2em',
        'float': 'right'
    })
    .button(
        {
            text: false,
            icons:
                {
                    primary: 'ui-icon-pencil'
                }
        }
    )
    .bind(
        'click',
        function () {
            alert('Edit clicked');
            EditClicked(this);
            return false;
        }
    );

(As a plus: you can avoid chaining .css() by passing it an object).

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