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I understand this is probably going to be a very amatuerish and vague question, but I have just built a desktop Java application and I am now trying to port it over to the web.

I understand I can use JSP's for this. However, having many classes and lots of code, I don't really understand the process I will need to go through to port it to a JSP. Can someone provide a basic explanation of how this is done and what I will need to do to convert it to a JSP. Is there a great deal of work involved or is it relatively simple?

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closed as not a real question by home, casperOne Aug 13 '12 at 14:06

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Just to understand the context - you just built a desktop app and now you realize that you need a web-enabled version as well? In general, you have to rewrite all UI related aspects (but it depends on the frameworks you used, etc.). IMO, this question is too broad, so I voted to close it. –  home Aug 10 '12 at 17:17
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You should change your question's title to something like: "What and how to reuse code between Java Desktop Application and a Java Web Application?" What do you think? –  axcdnt Aug 10 '12 at 17:20
    
"built a desktop Java application and I am now trying to port it over to the web." A better option is probably to launch the desktop application from a link using Java Web Start. As to 'amateurish' - yep. sure is. I'd have hoped that someone with 150+ rep. would realize that when asking questions that move them into 'new territory' it would not hurt to provide more context as to 'what' & 'why'. E.G. The boss has asked me to make the in-house CRM software (what) available to employees in the branch offices (why the 'web.app.'). –  Andrew Thompson Aug 11 '12 at 3:34
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4 Answers

If you ever heard about MVC concept you may do it easily. Since you create your utility classes, model and database access in a way it's decoupled and self contained, it's quite easy.

With the MVC concept in mind, the main consideration you must keep is that - the only change you need to do is in the view, according to MVC definition. What does it mean? If you have a Java Desktop Application I suppose you are programming Swing or something related. When using Java for Web, you should be working with JSP, JSF, etc.

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Jsp is only a language for presentation layer that have a logic in its back end.So your program logic don't need to change.(it is the good part of my answer!) (And th bad part is that) converting from desktop(swing) to jsp is not possible. In other words your desktop presentation code should be replace by jsp code that is a long proccess can't be answered in Stack Overflow. For learning jsp i advice you this books:

  • Head first jsp & servlet
  • Core jsp and servlets
  • and many online tutorial you can find in internet.

Edit: I shoud add to my answer that jsp is not a good solution for making rich web interfaces(probably your case is).My advise is GWT.

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It depends upon the following:

  • how you have coded your Java Desktop application.If you have User Interface loosely coupled from business logic, you should be able to write a new Web UI using JSP/Javascript and connect it to your business logic.
  • Your understanding of Web Technologies.
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It will be a great deal of work. Or not, depending on the app.

If you're properly separated out the actual functionality (i.e., everything not related to the GUI) it will be a matter of replacing the GUI. You may want to consider JSF, as it's a closer model to Swing than an action-oriented JSP solution–you'll need more than just JSP.

You need something for the JSP to interact with, whether servlets, Spring MVC, Struts 2, JSF, etc. If you're doing a web app, you need both client and server sides of it.

You could also consider using a JavaScript-based framework, like ExtJS, Dojo, etc.

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