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I tried to create a custom .NET attribute with the code below but accidentally left off the subclass. This generated an easily-fixed compiler error shown in the comment.

// results in compiler error CS0641: Attribute 'AttributeUsage' is 
// only valid on classes derived from System.Attribute
[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Class)]
internal class ToolDeclarationAttribute
{
    internal ToolDeclarationAttribute()
    {
    }
}

My question is how does the compiler know the [AttributeUsage] attribute can only be applied to a subclass of System.Attribute? Using .NET Reflector I don't see anything special on the AttributeUsageAttribute class declaration itself. Unfortunately this might just be a special case generated by the compiler itself.

[Serializable, ComVisible(true), AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Class, Inherited=true)]
public sealed class AttributeUsageAttribute : Attribute
{
    ...

I would like to be able to specify that my custom attribute can only be placed on subclasses of a particular class (or interface). Is this possible?

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This restriction is sometimes a sign you should be using a marker Interface instead. It performs the same functions, except when you need to pass class-level metadata as a parameter. So if instances can just as easily provide say, a count of something, the interface can require a public property getting that. If it has to be class-level, you're stuck with Attributes. –  Chris Moschini Jun 11 '12 at 9:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 21 down vote accepted

I would like to be able to specify that my custom attribute can only be placed on subclasses of a particular class (or interface). Is this possible?

Actually, there is a way to do this for subclasses (but not interfaces) using protected - see Restricting Attribute Usage. To reproduce the code (but not the discussion):

abstract class MyBase {
    [AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Property)]
    protected sealed class SpecialAttribute : Attribute {}
}
class ShouldBeValid : MyBase {
    [Special] // works fine
    public int Foo { get; set; }
}
class ShouldBeInvalid { // not a subclass of MyBase
    [Special] // type or namespace not found
    [MyBase.Special] // inaccessible due to protection level
    public int Bar{ get; set; }
}
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Excellent thanks! To be honest I never considered doing this until I got the compiler error but I will definitely your solution. –  Brian Ensink Jul 28 '09 at 1:14

AttributeUsageAttribute is just a magic class (like Attribute itself is). This is a built-in compiler rule, and you cannot do something like that for your own attributes.

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