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List<double> a = new List<double>{1,2,3};
List<double> b = new List<double>{1,2,3,4,5};

a + b should give me 2,4,6,4,5

obvisouly i can write a loop but is there a better way? using linq?

share|improve this question
    
You will have to write a loop. – jjnguy Jul 27 '09 at 21:21
    
Are you looking for distinct values (no repetitions? Also, what about the 1? – Babak Naffas Jul 27 '09 at 21:21
1  
Do you mean {2,4,6,4,5}? I.e. {1+1, 2+2, 3+3, 0+4, 0+5)? – Pavel Minaev Jul 27 '09 at 21:23
1  
Should that be 2,4,6,4,5? – Marc Gravell Jul 27 '09 at 21:24
1  
Shouldn't it be 2,4,6,4,5? – crauscher Jul 27 '09 at 21:24

11 Answers 11

You could use a modified "zip" operation easily enough, but nothing built in. Something like:

    static void Main() {
        var a = new List<int> { 1, 2, 3 };
        var b = new List<int> { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 };
        foreach (var c in a.Merge(b, (x, y) => x + y)) {
            Console.WriteLine(c);
        }
    }
    static IEnumerable<T> Merge<T>(this IEnumerable<T> first,
            IEnumerable<T> second, Func<T, T, T> operation) {
        using (var iter1 = first.GetEnumerator())
        using (var iter2 = second.GetEnumerator()) {
            while (iter1.MoveNext()) {
                if (iter2.MoveNext()) {
                    yield return operation(iter1.Current, iter2.Current);
                } else {
                    yield return iter1.Current;
                }
            }
            while (iter2.MoveNext()) {
                yield return iter2.Current;
            }
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Why is your solution so long? – jjnguy Jul 27 '09 at 21:26
2  
because it is reusable with any number of sequences and operations - not just lists/indexers/addition. Fixed the vertical space... better? – Marc Gravell Jul 27 '09 at 21:28
1  
touche ! – jjnguy Jul 27 '09 at 21:29
    
It only works when the two lists are of the same time. Check out my proposed solution, which takes in to account lists of different types. – IRBMe Jul 27 '09 at 21:54
1  
The operation isn't called for non-existing items. We ended up modifying it to call operation with default(T) passed for missing operand. Thanks! – Pasi Savolainen May 20 '15 at 10:46

Using .NET 4.0's Zip operator:

var sums = b.Zip(a, (x, y) => x + y)
            .Concat(b.Skip(a.Count()));

If you want to generalize this, check which has more elements and use that as the "b" above.

share|improve this answer
    
"check which has more elements and use that as the "b" above." - How? – first timer May 5 '15 at 1:55
Enumerable.Range(0, new[] { a.Count, b.Count }.Max())
    .Select(n => a.ElementAtOrDefault(n) + b.ElementAtOrDefault(n));
share|improve this answer
1  
Personally, I would use Math.Max(a.Count, b.Count) instead of new[] { a.Count, b.Count }.Max(). – Ryan Versaw Jul 28 '09 at 6:15
    
good point, shorter than mine. – gabe Jul 28 '09 at 14:42
3  
ElementAtOrDefault, being for IEnumerable, will (probably) traverse the whole list. Probably better to do the longer a.Count > n ? a[n] : 0 instead. – Mark Brackett Aug 6 '09 at 21:47

How about this:

List<double> doubles = Enumerable.Range(0, Math.Max(a.Count, b.Count))
    .Select(x => (a.Count > x ? a[x] : 0) + (b.Count > x ? b[x] : 0))
    .ToList();
share|improve this answer
    
What if my a/b collections are IEnumerable and are not Lists? – Orion Edwards Aug 29 '10 at 22:09
    
In that case in order to be efficient you'll have to iterate both lists simultaneously so use Marc Gravell's implementation. – Handcraftsman Aug 30 '10 at 4:45

I had to slightly adjust Marc's solution for my use to allow for lists of different types, so I thought I'd post in incase anyone else needs it.

public static IEnumerable<TResult> Merge<TFirst,TSecond,TResult>(this IEnumerable<TFirst> first,
            IEnumerable<TSecond> second, Func<TFirst, TSecond, TResult> operation) {
    using (var iter1 = first.GetEnumerator()) {
        using (var iter2 = second.GetEnumerator()) {
            while (iter1.MoveNext()) {
                if (iter2.MoveNext()) {
                    yield return operation(iter1.Current, iter2.Current);
                } else {
                    yield return operation(iter1.Current, default(TSecond));
                }
            }
            while (iter2.MoveNext()) {
                yield return operation(default(TFirst),  iter2.Current);
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Below is a solution to your problem.

List<double> a = new List<double>{1,2,3};
List<double> b = new List<double>{1,2,3,4,5};

List<double> sum = new List<double>();
int max = Math.Min(a.Count, b.Count);
for (int i = 0; i < max; i++){
    sum.Add(a[i] + b[i]);
}

if (a.Count < b.Count)
    for (int i = max i < b.Count)
        sum.Add(b[i]);
else
    for (int i = max i < a.Count)
    sum.Add(a[i]);
share|improve this answer
    
From OP: "obvisouly i can write a loop but is there a better way?" – Marc Gravell Jul 27 '09 at 21:29
1  
Touche again..... – jjnguy Jul 27 '09 at 21:29
    
The code is good, though; I've +1'd to negate the (unfair, IMO) downvote. – Marc Gravell Jul 27 '09 at 21:41
    
Well, thanks..I shall +1 you 'cuz you answered his question. – jjnguy Jul 27 '09 at 22:24

The ugly LINQ solution:

var sum = Enumerable.Range(0, (a.Count > b.Count) ? a.Count : b.Count)
    .Select(i => (a.Count > i && b.Count > i) ? a[i] + b[i] : (a.Count > i) ? a[i] : b[i]);
share|improve this answer

In this case, whether lists are of the same length, or of different lengths, it doesn't really matter. .NET class library doesn't have Enumerable.Zip method to combine two sequences (it will only come in .NET 4.0), and you would need something like that here either way. So you either have to write a loop, or to write your own Zip (which would still involve a loop).

There are some hacks to squeeze this all in a single LINQ query without loops, involving joining on indices, but those would be very slow and really pointless.

share|improve this answer
    
Why, exactly, did this get a -1? If it is factually incorrect, please point out the specific problems. Otherwise, I do not see how this is not a direct answer to the question as stated ("i can write a loop but is there a better way? using linq?"). – Pavel Minaev Jul 27 '09 at 22:12
    
My solution used LINQ with no loop. Obviously there will be loop done by LINQ, but it will be written by the compiler. – Yuriy Faktorovich Jul 28 '09 at 4:42

What happened to the 1 and the extra 2 and 3? If you're looking for distinct values:

var one = new List<int> { 1, 2, 3 };
var two = new List<int> { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 };

foreach (var x in one.Union(two)) Console.Write("{0} ", x);

Will give you 1 2 3 4 5

If you're looking for just the second list appended to the first then:

foreach(var x in one.Concat(two)) // ...

will give you 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 5

Edit: Oh, I see, you're looking for a sort of Zip, but which returns the extra parts. Try this:

public static IEnumerable<V> Zip<T, U, V>(
	this IEnumerable<T> one,
	IEnumerable<U> two,
	Func<T, U, V> f)
{
	using (var oneIter = one.GetEnumerator()) {
		using (var twoIter = two.GetEnumerator()) {
			while (oneIter.MoveNext()) {
				twoIter.MoveNext();
				yield return f(oneIter.Current,
					twoIter.MoveNext() ?
						twoIter.Current :
						default(U));
			}

			while (twoIter.MoveNext()) {
				yield return f(oneIter.Current, twoIter.Current);
			}
		}
	}
}

and here's one that's more like a normal zip function, which doesn't return the extras:

public static IEnumerable<V> Zip<T, U, V>(
	this IEnumerable<T> one,
	IEnumerable<U> two,
	Func<T, U, V> f)
{
	using (var oneIter = one.GetEnumerator()) {
		using (var twoIter = two.GetEnumerator()) {
			while (oneIter.MoveNext()) {
				yield return f(oneIter.Current,
					twoIter.MoveNext() ?
						twoIter.Current :
						default(U));
			}
		}
	}
}

Example usage:

var one = new List<int>  { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
var two = new List<char> { 'h', 'e', 'l', 'l', 'o' };

foreach (var x in one.Zip(two, (a,b) => new {A = a, B =b }))
	Console.WriteLine("{0} => '{1}'", x.A, x.B);

Results in:

1 => 'h'
2 => 'e'
3 => 'l'
4 => 'l'
5 => 'o'

share|improve this answer
    
He is actually trying to do a pairwise sum of elements in both lists, treating missing elements from shorter lists as 0. – Pavel Minaev Jul 27 '09 at 21:31
    
I see! I've edited my answer to include that functionality. – IRBMe Jul 27 '09 at 21:55
    
This is incorrect; the value of Current is undefined it you don't know that MoveNext returns true; in fact, for older iterators they will throw an exception if you do this; see msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/…: "Current also throws an exception if the last call to MoveNext returned false, which indicates the end of the collection." – Marc Gravell Jul 27 '09 at 21:57
    
Specifically, when you use twoIter.MoveNext() without checking the value, then access twoIter.Current, or in the second while loop where you access oneIter.Current when you know that oneIter.MoveNext() has returned false. – Marc Gravell Jul 27 '09 at 21:59
    
It works fine according to this: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… The only way you can invalidate the enumerator is by modifying the collection partway through. If you continue to call GetNext, it simply continues to return false until you call Reset. – IRBMe Jul 27 '09 at 22:00

Here's 3 more:

Make the lists the same size, then just simple Select.

(a.Count < b.Count ? a : b).AddRange(new double[Math.Abs(a.Count - b.Count)]);
var c = a.Select((n, i) => n + b[i]);

Don't make them the same size, but go through the longest and check for end of range on the shortest (store shortList.Count for easy perf gain):

var longList = a.Count > b.Count ? a : b;
var shortList = longList == a ? b : a;
var c = longList.Select((n, i) => n + (shortList.Count > i ? shortList[i] : 0));

Take while you can, then Skip and Union the rest:

var c = a.Take(Math.Min(a.Count, b.Count))
         .Select((n, i) => n + b[i])
         .Union(a.Skip(Math.Min(a.Count, b.Count));
share|improve this answer

My implementation using a loop:

List<double> shorter, longer;
if (a.Count > b.Count)
{
    shorter = b; longer = a
}
else
{
    shorter = a; longer = b;
}

List<double> result = new List<double>(longer);
for (int i = 0; i < shorter.Count; ++i)
{
     result[i] += shorter[i];
}
share|improve this answer
    
Note that this is an addition to my other answer which explains why this cannot be done via LINQ in 3.5. It's just an attempt to provide the shortest and most readable loop-based implementation. – Pavel Minaev Jul 27 '09 at 21:46

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