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Both the VelocityTools Tools Usage Summary and the DateTool Javadoc seem to indicate a configuration mechanism for setting a TimeZone, but I simply can't discover what that is.

DateTool's timezone setter is protected, and I don't want repeatedly pass a TimeZone into the overloaded format() methods.

(VelocityTools 2.0)

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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

To pass configuration values to standard tools, you have to explicitly list them in your WEB-INF/tools.xml file:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<tools>
  <toolbox scope="application">
    <tool key="date"
          class="org.apache.velocity.tools.generic.DateTool"
          timezone="GMT+7"/>
    ...
  </toolbox>
  ...
</tools>

Please note that you can use the org.apache.velocity.tools.generic.ComparisonDateTool for the same purpose, which adds some nice date-time comparison features.

If you are not relying on the VelocityView tools loading mechanism, then it means you are putting yourself the tools in the Velocity context. If so, then the configuration values are to manually be given to the tools configure(Map). For instance:

DateTool date = new DateTool();
Map config = new HashMap();
config.put("timezone","GMT+7");
tool.configure(config);
context.put("date",tool);
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Thanks. Is this still the way to configure the tools even if I'm not using Velocity as my view library, just calling it directly for some specific, limited purpose? –  dbreaux Aug 16 '12 at 13:35
1  
It depends if you're relying on the VelocityView or not. If not, then it means you are putting yourself the tools in the Velocity context. If so, then the configuration values are to be given to the tools configure(Map) method. –  Claude Brisson Aug 16 '12 at 13:53
    
I'm not using VelocityView. I put the DateTool instance directly on the VelocityContext. I tried incantations of sending settings to that, but I didn't find any that worked. Do you have a pointer to an example? (I also assumed all the Java-recognized Timezone strings were valid. Hopefully that's true.) –  dbreaux Aug 16 '12 at 14:15
1  
I think that the following code would work: DateTool date = new DateTool(); Map config = new HashMap(); config.put("timezone","GMT+7"); tool.configure(config); –  Claude Brisson Aug 16 '12 at 15:24
    
Will try. I thought I had done that (although using a named timezone string). Suggest you add that as a second answer. If it works, I'll accept it (already up-voted this one) :) –  dbreaux Aug 16 '12 at 15:27

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