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I am confused about the following statements in the CUDA programming guide 4.0 section 5.3.2.1 in the chapter of Performance Guidelines.

Global memory resides in device memory and device memory is accessed
via 32-, 64-, or 128-byte memory transactions. 

These memory transactions must be naturally aligned:Only the 32-, 64- , 
128- byte segments of device memory 
that are aligned to their size (i.e. whose first address is a 
multiple of their size) can be read or written by memory 
transactions.

1) My understanding of device memory was that accesses to the device memory by threads is uncached: So if thread accesses memory location a[i] it will fetch only a[i] and none of the values around a[i]. So the first statement seems to contradict this. Or perhaps I am misunderstanding the usage of the phrase "memory transaction" here?

2) The second sentence does not seem very clear. Can someone explain this?

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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted
  1. Memory transactions are performed per warp. So 32 byte transactions is a warp sized read of an 8 bit type, 64 byte transactions is a warp sized read of an 16 bit type, and 128 byte transactions is a warp sized read of an 32 bit type.
  2. It just means that all reads have to be aligned to a natural word size boundary. It is not possible for a warp to read a 128 byte transaction with a one byte offset. See this answer for more details.
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Thank you. Just to clarify, if a warp needs to read 128 bytes for a 128 byte transaction, the first byte of the 128 byte group should be a multiple of 128, right? And similarly for 32 byte transactions and 64 byte transactions? –  smilingbuddha Aug 10 '12 at 20:51
    
@smilingbuddha: yes that is how it works. –  talonmies Aug 10 '12 at 20:53
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The requirements that you describe are necessary for maximum performance as it makes it possible for the GPU to service all the threads in the warp with a single memory transaction. But it is not an absolute requirement. Each thread in a warp can read from any address, as long as the addresses are correctly aligned. The GPU will automatically schedule as many transactions as required. This is what is called "scattered read/write". –  Roger Dahl Aug 10 '12 at 21:09
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In other words, the statement, "if a warp needs to read 128 bytes for a 128 byte transaction, the first byte of the 128 byte group should be a multiple of 128", is correct, but with an emphasis on, "should". It is required for the best performance. A 128 byte read from a warp means that each thread reads 4 bytes. In that case, each thread can read from any 4-byte aligned address in memory, though you may end up with 32 separate transactions. –  Roger Dahl Aug 10 '12 at 21:16
    
@Roger Dahl So that means, if the each of the threads of the warp need to read data from addresses "far away" from each other, the GPU will issue 32 memory transactions(one for each thread of the warp) rather than a single memory transaction, correct? –  smilingbuddha Aug 10 '12 at 21:17
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