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Here is the context:

I am building a .aspx page that allows the user to administrate some xml documents we have on our server. The page content is loaded using AJAX, so buttons and forms are dynamically added to the document.

If I had static buttons that I was creating within the .aspx page before it loads on the client's machine, I could attach an event to it very easily. However, I'm dynamically adding and removing buttons and forms on the fly, using jQuery.

Here is a simplified example:

In the following jsFiddle, I'm pretending that the html document contains the following script:

<script language="C#" type="text/C#" runat="server">
void SaveAllChanges(Object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    Button clickedButton = (Button)sender;
    clickedButton.Text = "foobar";
}
</script>

And that I have a javascript file that contains the following:

$('button.buttonGenerator').click(function() {

    $('.buttonContainer').append(
        '<button onclick="SaveAllChanges">' +
        'Save All Changes!' +
        '</button>'
    );

});

Obviously the buttons I am creating can not run the function SaveAllChanges with the way it is now. I added the onclick attribute to show what I needed to happen, in a pseudo-code kind of style.

How can I make it so that dynamically added buttons can run the C# method I have defined within the script tag at the top of the document?

Here is the jsfiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/2XwRJ/

Thanks.

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3 Answers 3

You can give all buttons that must save changes a common class (e.g. class="ajaxButton") and have one jQuery method that responds to click events on elements matching that class (use live so that updates to the DOM are reflected).

$("button.ajaxButton").live("click", function(){
  // Perform your Ajax callback to run server-side code
});
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2  
live() is deprecated as of jQuery 1.7. Use on.('click'); –  sent1nel Aug 10 '12 at 20:24
    
It isn't the jQuery code that is the issue. It's actually linking up the .ajax() method with an aspx script on my server. –  bdrelling Aug 10 '12 at 21:26

What you need to do is use something like ..

$(document).ready(function() {
  $('button.buttonGenerator').click(function() {
    $('.buttonContainer').append(
        '<button id="#dynamicCommentButton" onclick="SaveAllChanges">' +
        'Save All Changes!' +
        '</button>'
    );
  });
  $(document).on('click', '#dynamicCommentButton', function() {
    alert($(this).attr('id'));
  });
});
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Sorry if I'm not understanding, but how does this help me run an aspx script on my server other than just assigning a function to an id? I know how the jQuery should be working, what I don't know is how to set up my code to send data to an aspx script that I have on my server. –  bdrelling Aug 10 '12 at 21:26
    
Oh, sorry, your question ("How can I make it so that dynamically added buttons can run the C# method I have defined within the script tag at the top of the document?") is slightly ambiguous lol. Make an AJAX call passing vars to be saved? Otherwise, I'd say use websockets. stackoverflow.com/questions/8492940/… –  sent1nel Aug 11 '12 at 3:19

You are not going to be able to add the buttons like you have it there as this code here is just adding it as an HTML DOM element and the onclick attribute will be the on the client element. As a result clicking the button will try fire a SaveAllChanges javascript function

$('.buttonContainer').append(
        '<button onclick="SaveAllChanges">' +
        'Save All Changes!' +
        '</button>'
 );

What would be best would be to create that SaveAllChanges function in javascript and then you can handle it from there. Two of the ways I see you being able to do this are:

  1. Have a http endpoint setup (script service, web api or just posting to a page) that you call using Ajax from your javascript. You can then pass through any needed arguments.
  2. You could have a hidden element and hidden button on the page so that when the javascript is called it populates any arguments you need and then clicks the hidden button and posts the page back.

Personally I would choose the first approach from a user experience stand point as the page will not be posting back each time. I have used something similar to the second approach and it works fine but just feels very clunky.

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