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I know a string concatenation question has been asked to death in SE. But to the best of my knowledge,I've gone through all the questions that could help me, in vain.

This is what I am hoping to accomplish with this program:

Initially I have a=0 and b=1, for n=0 and n=1 respectively.

For the next input i.e from n=3 onwards, my result should be concatenation of the previous two strings. (Like a Fibonacci sequence; only the addition is replaced by concatenation)

So,for example:
For n=3, my output should be "10".
For n=4, my output should be "101"
For n=5, my output should be "10110"

There is no logical problem with the code I've written,but I'm getting a SIGSEGV error and I don't see why.

#include <iostream>
#include<new>
#include<string.h>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    long int n,i;
    char *a="0";
    char *b="1";
    char *c=new char[100000];

cout<<"Enter  a number n:";
cin>>n;

for(i=0;i<n;i++)
{

    strcat(b,a);
    strcpy(a,b);

}
cout<<"\nRequired string="<<b;

}

What am I doing wrong?

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I think you forgot to use c :) –  w00te Aug 10 '12 at 21:00
    
I did intend to use 'c',but I found that it was an unnecessary variable to work with :) Just forgot that I'd declared it. –  abhiii5459 Aug 10 '12 at 21:16
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6 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

strcat(b,a); invokes undefined behaviour because b points to a string literal.

char * strcat ( char * destination, const char * source );

Concatenate strings Appends a copy of the source string to the destination string.

Since this is C++, I suggest you use std::string and the + operator. Or a std::stringstream.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I understand now :) And mission accomplished :D Thank you. –  abhiii5459 Aug 10 '12 at 21:14
    
+1 for suggesting std::string/std::stringstream, you can never say it enough times. –  Zyx 2000 Aug 10 '12 at 21:30
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The problem that you are observing has to do with undefined behavior: you are writing to the memory that has been allocated to a string literal.

To avoid the issue, you should switch to using C++ std::string: it makes your code a lot simpler by taking memory management out of the picture.

string a("0");
string b("1");
int n = 10;
for(int i=0;i<n;i++) {
    string tmp(a);
    a = b;
    b = tmp + b;
}
cout<<"Required string="<<b;
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Link to this code on ideone. –  dasblinkenlight Aug 10 '12 at 21:09
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char *a="0";
char *b="1";

"0" and "1" are string-literals (a has address of "0" and b has address of "1"), change of its contains is undefined behaviour.

strcat(b,a);
strcpy(a,b);

UB.

Since you use C++ better use std::string or std::stringstream.

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You have declared a and b as

char *a="0"; 
char *b="1";

These are pointers to constant strings. This means that the memory allocated to these pointers is fixed. When you write past this block of memory, Bad Things(TM) will happen.

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You are using strcat but your destination string is a string literal. strcat is then attempting to write past that strings terminating null character and that is where the seg fault comes in. Just don't try to modify string literals at all. Since you have the luxury of using C++ unless this is a learning exercise you would be much better off using std::string.

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You can use this code instead, I am showing to you that you need to think of the inital values of n = 1, 2 also you should handle wrong inputs with n < 0 and avoid dynamic allocation as you seems to use new for no obvious reason and you forgot to free the memory with delete at the end.

#include <iostream>
#include<new>
#include<string.h>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    long int n,i;
    char a[10];
    char b[10];
    char c[10];
    //char *c=new char[100000];
    cout<<"Enter  a number n:";
    cin>>n;

    strcpy(a, "0");
    strcpy(b, "1");

    if (n == 1)
        strcpy(b, a);
    else if (n > 2)
    {
        for(i=2;i<n;i++)
        {
            strcpy(c, a);
            strcat(c, b);
            strcpy(a, b);
            strcpy(b,c);
        }
    }
    else if (n != 2)
        cout<<"\nInvalid input!";

    cout<<"\nRequired string="<<b;

}

share|improve this answer
    
I tried this approach initially and although it's simple, it will not do for larger strings as the value of n increases –  abhiii5459 Aug 10 '12 at 21:18
    
Yes it will work small n only. –  Mahmoud Fayez Aug 10 '12 at 21:34
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