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When I see examples of how to detect whether a script in running in node vs. running in the browser, I see logic like:

if (typeof module !== 'undefined' && module.exports) {
    // do something that applies to node
} else {
    // do something that applies to browser
}

The node docs list the global module as being an {Object} which I believe means that typeof module should always be "object". Is that always correct in node? If so doesn't it make more sense to do detection logic like:

if (typeof module === 'object' && module.exports) {
    // do something that applies to node
} else {
    // do something that applies to browser
}
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I would say that in this context both forms are functionally equivalent. Given that, I would opt for the more common of the two to improve the one true metric of code quality –  bkconrad Aug 10 '12 at 21:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes, in all node versions so far, module has always been an object, and is likely to stay that way for all the 0.x versions. As to whether it makes sense to check for it being specifically an object as opposed to not undefined, it's a matter of style mostly. In the former example, since the code is probably only really concerned with adding properties to module.exports, it is more expressive and less brittle as coded. For example, in a future version of node, maybe module becomes a function. In that case, the former example still works whereas the latter example needs a minor change.

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That second snippet would probably work fine. But, no I don't think it makes more sense. You care far more about it existing than you care about what it is. And the standard way to check for existence in javascript is:

typeof myVar !== 'undefined'

So there is a bit of JS convention at work here.

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