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I have structs and vectors that looks like:

typedef struct
{
    int SX, SY;
    int X, Y, Z;
    std::vector<Vector3D> Vertices;
    const void* VBOPointer;
} Model;

typedef struct
{
    int X, Y;
    struct
    {
        int VX[4], VY[4];
        int TX[4], VY[4];
    } Quad;
} Item;

std::vector<Item> ListOfItems;
std::vector<Model> ListOfModels;

I need to copy these to memory so I can reconstruct them from another program. I've mapped the memory already but then I realized that I cannot use CopyMemory or MemCpy on any of them.

How can I copy it?

Example of how I copy standard data types/structs:

struct
{
    int X;
    int Y;
} POD;

//pData is a void pointer to mapped memory given to be by MapFileView..

POD Foo = {100, 50};
long double* Data = static_cast<long double*>(pData);
//Check if Data[1] contains a request command then copy.

CopyMemory(&Data[0], &Foo, sizeof(Foo));
share|improve this question
1  
i would write a serialize and deSerialize functions for each class –  Gir Aug 10 '12 at 21:10
    
Use a third-party - google protobuf comes to mind. –  Luchian Grigore Aug 10 '12 at 21:11
    
XDR is a standard way to do this that's totally independent of the machines involved. You could use it in your Serialize and Deserialize functions as @Gir suggests. –  Hbcdev Aug 10 '12 at 21:15

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Since you have to deal with non-POD data, you need to flatten the structure data into a serialized format that the other app can then parse back into a structure on its end.

Your ListOfItems vector can be flattened very easily because its elements are POD data. Store the vector size to an integer, copy that into the buffer, then copy each Item afterwards (assuming the buffer is large enough to hold the flattened data):

long double* Data = static_cast<long double*>(pData);  
//Check if Data[1] contains a request command then copy.  

unsigned char *Work = static_cast<unsigned char *>(pData);

int number = ListOfItems.size();
CopyMemory(Work, &number, sizeof(int)); 
Work += sizeof(int);

for (int i = 0; i < number; ++i)
{
    CopyMemory(Work, &ListOfItems[i], sizeof(Item)); 
    Work += sizeof(Item);
}

Your ListOfModels vector will be little bit harder to flatten since Model contains another vector in it, but the same concept applies in general:

long double* Data = static_cast<long double*>(pData);  
//Check if Data[1] contains a request command then copy.  

unsigned char *Work = static_cast<unsigned char *>(pData);

int number = ListOfModels.size();
CopyMemory(Work, &number, sizeof(int)); 
Work += sizeof(int);

for (int i = 0; i < number; ++i)
{
    Model &m = ListOfModels[i];

    CopyMemory(Work, &(m.SX), sizeof(int) * 5);
    Work += (sizeof(int) * 5);

    int num = m.Vertices.size();
    CopyMemory(Work, &num, sizeof(int));
    Work += sizeof(int);

    for (int j = 0; j < num; ++j)
    {
        Vector3D &v = m.Vertices[j];
        // copy v as needed...
        Work += ...;
    }

    // copy m.VBOPointer as needed ...
    Work += ...;
}

What I normally do for something like this is use templates to help simplify the logic and make it easier to read:

template<typename T>
void Copy(unsignd char* &Work, const T &value)
{
    CopyMemory(Work, &value, sizeof(T));
}

template<template T>
void Copy(unsigned char* &Work, const std::vector<T> &vec)
{
    int number = vec.size();
    Copy(Work, number);
    for (int i = 0; i < number; ++i)
        Copy(Work, vec[i]);
}

.

long double* Data = static_cast<long double*>(pData);  
//Check if Data[1] contains a request command then copy.  

unsigned char *Work = static_cast<unsigned char *>(pData);
Copy(Work, ListOfItems);

.

template<>
void Copy<Vector3D>(unsigned char* &Work, const Vector3D &vec)
{
    // copy vec as needed...
    Work += ...;
}

template<>
void Copy<Model>(unsigned char* &Work, const Model &m)
{
    Copy(Work, m.SX);
    Copy(Work, m.SY);
    Copy(Work, m.X);
    Copy(Work, m.Y);
    Copy(Work, m.Z);
    Copy(Work, m.Vertices);

    // copy m.VBOPointer as needed ...
    Work += ...;
}

long double* Data = static_cast<long double*>(pData);  
//Check if Data[1] contains a request command then copy.  

unsigned char *Work = static_cast<unsigned char *>(pData);
Copy(Work, ListOfModels);
share|improve this answer
    
size_t is more appropriate than int (or unsigned at the least). –  GManNickG Aug 10 '12 at 21:57
    
Sure, size_t is appropriate to match size() (even better, std::vector::size_type). But for serialization purposes, it is best to pick a type that both apps recognize and can agree on regarding byte size, endian, etc. So I would probably be more tempted to use uint32_t for handling the byte size, and as long as the apps are on the same machine then endian is not an issue, but it does become an issue if the apps are on different machines communicating with each other (serialization gains you that ability). –  Remy Lebeau Aug 10 '12 at 22:32

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