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I have written a forward proxy. I gonna use it for both windows and linux. I do have required changes as per the OS. However, I keep seeing some raise conditions. Mostly I believe they are due to my misunderstanding in guessing which is the last packet (FIN sigal). Currently I do select on set of sockets. Whichever socket gets signalled, I do read() on it. If read returns 0 then I assume it is a FIN packet and I close that socket. Can it happen that my read() gives non zero value. But that packet does contain FIN (I think it can happen). So, I do not close some sockets though they have got closed. I am not sure how proxies detect which socket has closed? Or which is a last packet on the established connection.

My code looks like follow:

I have 100 fds which I have accepted from client. I store them an array sock_array[total_size].

select(copy_of_sock_array,timeout)                                                          
for(int cnt=0;cnt<total_size;cnt++)                                                          
{                                                                                            
   if(FD_ISSET(sock_array[cnt],sock_array))                                                  
   {
            ret = recv(sock_array[cnt],buffer,len);                                          
            if(ret<=0){                                                                      
                /*This must be a FIN packet */                                               
                /* Close corresponding socket which is opened with outer world */            
                close(/*corresponding socket*/);                                                                      
            }                                                                                  
   }                                                                                          
}                                                                                                

Does this look ok?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
your code is wrong. When Connection is closed (you shouldn't talk about FIN, just the connection is closed by the other end which could be cause by FIN or RST) recv() returns 0. -1 ONLY is there was an error (you could check for EAGAIN in non-blocking sockets). –  diegows Aug 11 '12 at 1:30
    
@diegows. That's not correct. FIN causes a return of zero. RST causes a return of -1 with errno=ECONNRESET. –  EJP Aug 11 '12 at 2:03
    
@EJP yes, I forgot that :) –  diegows Aug 11 '12 at 19:52

2 Answers 2

You need to do a non-blocking read, and keep reading from the socket until you get a return value that indicates you should stop reading.

ssize_t r = 0;
for (;;) {
    r = recv(sock, buf, bufsz, MSG_DONTWAIT);
    if (r <= 0) {
        if (r < 0 && errno == EINTR) {
            continue;
        }
        break;
    }
    /* ... handle data in buf .. */
}
if (r < 0) {
    if (errno == EAGAIN) {
        /* ... wait in select again ... */
    } else {
        /* ... handle error ... */
    }
} else {
    /* got FIN */
}

Note that just because FIN is received does not necessarily mean the connection should be closed. The FIN merely indicates that no more data will be sent, but the peer may still be willing to accept more data. This can happen in HTTP where the client only wants a single response, so it delivers a FIN after its request. It still expects to receive the response though.

Your proxy likely has two sockets, say sock1 and sock2. So receipt of the FIN on sock1 should mean that this indication be forwarded onto sock2 after any data that has been queued on it has been delivered (and the mirror is true as well). You can forward the FIN by using shutdown.

shutdown(sock2, SHUT_WR);

When FIN has been received from both sock1 and sock2, you can call close on both sockets.

So addressing your questions.

Can it happen that my read() gives non zero value. But that packet does contain FIN (I think it can happen).

Yes, this may happen. This is why you continue reading until you get an indication to stop. Well, technically, you don't have to. You can defer that until you have processed some other connection if you have per connection fairness issues. But, you need to come back to it and finish reading before you enter your select wait.

So, I do not close some sockets though they have got closed. I am not sure how proxies detect which socket has closed? Or which is a last packet on the established connection.

As I described, as a (transparent) proxy, the socket can be safely closed once you have forwarded a FIN on it and a FIN has been received on it. If you are not a transparent proxy, you play by a different set of rules, since you really are the server for the client in that case. So, you can close the socket whenever the application protocol you are implementing permits you to do so.

share|improve this answer
    
Hey, I have added my code. Can I close my connection the way I am doing? –  agent.smith Aug 10 '12 at 23:27
    
@agent.smith: You shouldn't close the socket on FIN unless you have already forwarded a FIN that came from the other socket. When you get a FIN, it should be forwarded on the other socket. –  jxh Aug 10 '12 at 23:30
    
How to forward FIN? I thot doing close on outer world socket will send FIN to it. –  agent.smith Aug 10 '12 at 23:37
    
@agent.smith: In my answer, I explained the way to forward it is with shutdown. –  jxh Aug 11 '12 at 0:04

Sockets have a well defined behavior. If you receive data and the connection is closed after that, you'll need two read()s. The first will return the data and the second one will return 0, to signal the end of connection.

You always have to read until the syscall returns 0.

And you don't need a non-blocking read to detect this!

share|improve this answer
    
Of course non-blocking is not required, but if not non-blocking, what is the point of using select? –  jxh Aug 10 '12 at 22:32
    
Ok, I didn't notice that I is using select. –  diegows Aug 11 '12 at 1:27

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