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When using GCD, we want to wait until two async blocks are executed and done before moving on to the next steps of execution. What is the best way to do that?

We tried the following, but it doesn't seem to work:

dispatch_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_HIGH, 0), ^ {
    // block1
});


dispatch_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_HIGH, 0), ^ {
    // block2
});

// wait until both the block1 and block2 are done before start block3
// how to do that?

dispatch_sync(dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_HIGH, 0), ^ {
    // block3
});
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5 Answers 5

up vote 43 down vote accepted

Use dispatch groups: see here for an example, "Waiting on Groups of Queued Tasks" in the "Dispatch Queues" chapter of Apple's iOS Developer Library's Concurrency Programming Guide

Your example could look something like this:

dispatch_group_t group = dispatch_group_create();

dispatch_group_async(group,dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_HIGH, 0), ^ {
    // block1
    NSLog(@"Block1");
    [NSThread sleepForTimeInterval:5.0];
    NSLog(@"Block1 End");
});


dispatch_group_async(group,dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_HIGH, 0), ^ {
    // block2
    NSLog(@"Block2");
    [NSThread sleepForTimeInterval:8.0];
    NSLog(@"Block2 End");
});

dispatch_group_notify(group,dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_HIGH, 0), ^ {
    // block3
    NSLog(@"Block3");
});

dispatch_release(group);

and could produce output like this:

2012-08-11 16:10:18.049 Dispatch[11858:1e03] Block1
2012-08-11 16:10:18.052 Dispatch[11858:1d03] Block2
2012-08-11 16:10:23.051 Dispatch[11858:1e03] Block1 End
2012-08-11 16:10:26.053 Dispatch[11858:1d03] Block2 End
2012-08-11 16:10:26.054 Dispatch[11858:1d03] Block3
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2  
Cool. will the async tasks/blocks, once associated with the group, be executed sequentially or concurrently? I mean, assume that block1 and block2 are associated with a group now, will block2 wait until block1 is done before it can start executing? –  tom Aug 10 '12 at 22:25
3  
That's up to you. dispatch_group_async is just like dispatch_asyncwith a group parameter added. So if you use different queues for block1 and block2 or schedule them on the same concurrent queue, they can run concurrently; if you schedule them on the same serial queue, they'll run serially. It's no different from scheduling the blocks without groups. –  Jörn Eyrich Aug 11 '12 at 14:12
    
Does this also apply to executing web service post? –  jeraldo Apr 17 at 9:36

Expanding on Jörn Eyrich answer (upvote his answer if you upvote this one), if you do not have control over the dispatch_async calls for your blocks, as might be the case for async completion blocks, you can use the GCD groups using dispatch_group_enter and dispatch_group_leave directly.

In this example is that we're pretending computeInBackground is something we cannot change (imagine it is a delegate callback, NSURLConnection completionHandler, or whatever), and thus we don't have access to the dispatch calls.

// create a group
dispatch_group_t group = dispatch_group_create();

// pair a dispatch_group_enter for each dispatch_group_leave
dispatch_group_enter(group);     // pair 1 enter
[self computeInBackground:1 completion:^{
    NSLog(@"1 done");
    dispatch_group_leave(group); // pair 1 leave
}];

// again... (and again...)
dispatch_group_enter(group);     // pair 2 enter
[self computeInBackground:2 completion:^{
    NSLog(@"2 done");
    dispatch_group_leave(group); // pair 2 leave
}];

// dispatch your final block after all the dispatch_group_enters
dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^{
    dispatch_group_wait(group, DISPATCH_TIME_FOREVER);
    NSLog(@"finally!");
});

In this example, computeInBackground:completion: is implemented as:

- (void)computeInBackground:(int)no completion:(void (^)(void))block {
    dispatch_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_HIGH, 0), ^{
        NSLog(@"%d starting", no);
        sleep(no*2);
        block();
    });
}

Output (with timestamps from a run):

12:57:02.574  2 running
12:57:02.574  1 running
12:57:04.590  1 done
12:57:06.590  2 done
12:57:06.591  finally!
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Real nice to sync async work. Thanks –  zumzum Jul 30 at 3:07

I know you asked about GCD, but if you wanted, NSOperationQueue also handles this sort of stuff really gracefully, e.g.:

NSOperationQueue *queue = [[NSOperationQueue alloc] init];

NSOperation *completionOperation = [NSBlockOperation blockOperationWithBlock:^{
    NSLog(@"Starting 3");
}];

NSOperation *operation;

operation = [NSBlockOperation blockOperationWithBlock:^{
    NSLog(@"Starting 1");
    sleep(7);
    NSLog(@"Finishing 1");
}];

[completionOperation addDependency:operation];
[queue addOperation:operation];

operation = [NSBlockOperation blockOperationWithBlock:^{
    NSLog(@"Starting 2");
    sleep(5);
    NSLog(@"Finishing 2");
}];

[completionOperation addDependency:operation];
[queue addOperation:operation];

[queue addOperation:completionOperation];
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This is fine when the code inside of your NSBlockOperation is synchronous. But what if it's not, and you want to trigger completion when your async operation is done? –  Greg Maletic Oct 23 '13 at 18:10
1  
@GregMaletic In that case, I make a NSOperation subclass that is concurrent and set isFinished when the asynchronous process completes. Then the dependencies work fine. –  Rob Oct 23 '13 at 18:23
    
@GregMaletic See stackoverflow.com/questions/18429011/… and stackoverflow.com/questions/17426855/… for examples. –  Rob Oct 23 '13 at 18:33
    
Thanks for the suggestion! I decided to go with GCD plus a dispatch_semaphore to notify when the async operations terminate. –  Greg Maletic Oct 25 '13 at 3:11
1  
@GregMaletic Yeah, you can use that, too (as long as dispatch_semaphore_wait is not taking place on the main queue and as long as your signals and waits are balanced). As long as your don't block the main queue, a semaphore approach is fine, if you don't need the flexibility of operations (e.g. having the ability to cancel them, ability to control degree of concurrency, etc). –  Rob Oct 25 '13 at 3:47

The first answer is essentially correct, but if you want the very simplest way to accomplish the desired result, here's a stand-alone code example demonstrating how to do it with a semaphore (which is also how dispatch groups work behind the scenes, JFYI):

#include <dispatch/dispatch.h>
#include <stdio.h>

main()
{
        dispatch_queue_t myQ = dispatch_queue_create("my.conQ", DISPATCH_QUEUE_CONCURRENT);
        dispatch_semaphore_t mySem = dispatch_semaphore_create(0);

        dispatch_async(myQ, ^{ printf("Hi I'm block one!\n"); sleep(2); dispatch_semaphore_signal(mySem);});
        dispatch_async(myQ, ^{ printf("Hi I'm block two!\n"); sleep(4); dispatch_semaphore_signal(mySem);});
        dispatch_async(myQ, ^{ dispatch_semaphore_wait(mySem, DISPATCH_TIME_FOREVER); printf("Hi, I'm the final block!\n"); });
        dispatch_main();
}
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3  
Two observations: 1. You're missing a dispatch_semaphore_wait. You have two signals, so you need two waits. As is, your "completion" block will start as soon as the first block signals the semaphore, but before the other block finishes; 2. Given this was an iOS question, I'd discourage the use of dispatch_main. –  Rob Oct 25 '13 at 3:40
    
I agree with Rob. This is not a valid solution. The dispatch_semaphore_wait will unblock as soon as either of the dispatch_semaphore_signal methods are called. The reason this may appear to work is that the printf for blocks 'one' and 'two' occur immediately, and the printf for the 'finally' occurs after a wait--thus after the block one has slept for 2 seconds. If you put the printf after the sleep calls, you'll get the output for 'one', then 2 seconds later for 'finally', then 2 seconds later for 'two'. –  ɲeuroburɳ Jan 3 at 17:48

Another GCD alternative is a barrier:

dispatch_queue_t queue = dispatch_queue_create("com.company.app.queue", DISPATCH_QUEUE_CONCURRENT);

dispatch_async(queue, ^{ 
    NSLog(@"start one!\n");  
    sleep(4);  
    NSLog(@"end one!\n");
});

dispatch_async(queue, ^{  
    NSLog(@"start two!\n");  
    sleep(2);  
    NSLog(@"end two!\n"); 
});

dispatch_barrier_async(queue, ^{  
    NSLog(@"Hi, I'm the final block!\n");  
});

Just create a concurrent queue, dispatch your two blocks, and then dispatch the final block with barrier, which will make it wait for the other two to finish.

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