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I have some data in the format below:

Pin|add
jtyjg
Kolk|aaa||
Kawr|wht u
Disnce
Djhdb|bbb||

I want to convert this to the format below:

Pin|add jtyjg Kolk|aaa||
Kawr|wht u Disnce Djhdb|bbb||

How can I do this?

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This needs more info. Using what criteria would the formatting happen? It's not really clear from your example. –  Pekka 웃 Aug 10 '12 at 21:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try this..

Input.txt

Pin|add
jtyjg
Kolk|aaa||
Kawr|wht u
Disnce
Djhdb|bbb||

Code

cat Input.txt | tr '\n' ' ' | sed 's/|| ./||~~/g' | tr '~~' '\n'| sed '/^$/d' > Output.txt

Output.txt

Pin|add jtyjg Kolk|aaa||
awr|wht u Disnce Djhdb|bbb||
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It's not quite clear what you want. This one-liner should work your example, though:

tr -d '\n' < oldfile | sed 's/||/||\n/g' > newfile

Depending on your system, you may need to use literal newlines for sed substitution like so:

tr -d '\n' < oldfile | sed 's/||/||\<RETURN>/g' > newfile
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This didn't work for me... The newlines came out as the letter 'n'. –  marklark Aug 13 '12 at 17:02
    
That makes sense if the reader is able to discern that the 2nd solution should be in a script (such as 'tr.sh', which is run as "sh tr.sh" on the command line)... Thanks! –  marklark Aug 24 '12 at 18:13

I've made the assumption that the original file doesn't have blanks before the end-of-line characters...

This is fairly basic Perl and works for v5.8.9

#!/usr/bin/perl

open( IN, '<', 'text.txt' );    # the input file
open( OUT, '>', 'text2.txt' );  # the output file

while( <IN> ) {
        chomp;          # get rid of the end-of-line characters
        $out .= $_;     # add the current input to the output string
        if ( /\|\|/ ) { # does this contain the output signal characters "||"?
                print( OUT "$out\n" );  # output the built string
                $out = '';              # clear the output string
        }
        else {
                $out = $out . ' ';      # append a space to the end
        }
}
print( OUT $out );                      # output anything left over...
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On the face of it, you want groups of three input lines to be combined into one with spaces in place of the original newlines. Given that the question does not restrict the tool-set, then a Perl solution is moderately apposite:

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my($l1, $l2, $l3);
while (defined($l1 = <>) && defined($l2 = <>) && defined($l3 = <>))
{
    chomp($l1, $l2);
    print "$l1 $l2 $l3";
}

If the number of lines in the input is not a multiple of three, the extra lines are omitted. The code does not handle each input file separately; it just combines them all together. For the given input data, the output is:

Pin|add jtyjg Kolk|aaa||
Kawr|wht u Disnce Djhdb|bbb||

This seems to be correct.

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