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I'm trying to parse a huge tab limited file (tsv file) and convert it into comma separated value file. The issue I'm having is that not all entries in the tsv file are complete and some of them are left incomplete and denoted by more than one tab spacing between the entries. Now when I'm converting this into csv file, I want "n.a" in between them indicating the absence of any entry in that field of the record.

For example, consider the student record sample(1 tab = 4 spaces, bear with my poor formatting)

Name    Age    Department    GPA
Kevin    21    Computer Science    3.4
Tom    20        3.8
Kelsey    22    Psychology        (2 tab spaces here)

In the above example the first record indicates the field title and every row is a record. We can observe that the 'Department' field entry is missing for Tom and 'GPA' field entry is missing for Kelsey. My output should be something like this:

"Name","Age","Department","GPA"
"Kevin","21","Computer Science","3.4"
"Tom","20","n.a","3.8"
"Kelsey","22","Psychology","n.a"

My Questions:
1) How can I resolve this issue? Python, java, bash, awk any script would do
2) Observe that the space between the words "Computer" & "Science" in the 2nd row under 'department' field is ignored and preserved. So the resulting script shouldn't be counting spaces.

Doing this perfectly is very important since I would be feeding the data for search indexing. Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
$ awk 'NR>0{$1=$1}1' OFS="," FILENAME > OUTPUT_FILE –  crazyim5 Aug 10 '12 at 22:07
    
I'm afraid we don't really see tabs in your paste, so you should make it clear whether there is always one tab between successive fields or not. –  Michał Górny Aug 10 '12 at 22:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This could be done in python very simply as:

import sys
[infile, outfile] = sys.argv[1:]

with open(infile) as inf:
    with open(outfile) as outf:
        for l in inf:
            outf.write(','.join(l.split('\t')).replace(',,',',n.a.,'))

The script would be used like

python convert_csv.py infile outfile
share|improve this answer

One way using awk:

awk '
    ## Split line with tabs, join them in output with commas.
    BEGIN {
        FS = "\t";
        OFS = ",";
    }

    ## For each line, check if any field is blank, and substitute with
    ## "n.a". Add double quotes, recompute line and print.
    {
        for ( i = 1; i <= NF; i++ ) {
            if ( $i == "" ) {
                $i = "n.a";
            }
            $i = "\"" $i "\"";
        }
        $1 = $1;
        print $0;
    }
' infile

Run it with following output:

"Name","Age","Department","GPA"
"Kevin","21","Computer Science","3.4"
"Tom","20","n.a","3.8"
"Kelsey","22","Psychology","n.a"
share|improve this answer
    
Excellent. Thank you very much. AWK is such a cool tool to do stuffs like these. –  crazyim5 Aug 10 '12 at 22:27

just use split('\t') on each line...

>>> x="a\t\tb"
>>> x
'a\t\tb'
>>> print x
a               b
>>> x.split("\t")
['a', '', 'b']
>>>
share|improve this answer

In python,

inputFile = open.("yourFile.tsv", "r")
outputFile = open.("output.csv", "w")

for line in inputFile:
    entry = line.split("\t")
    for i in range(len(entry)):
        if entry[i] == '':
            entry[i] = "n.a"
    outputFile.write(",".join(entry))

inputFile.close()
outputFile.close()

Should work, although it's not particularly Pythonic.

share|improve this answer
    
This is the best solution. Thanks –  crazyim5 Aug 10 '12 at 22:25
    
@crazyim5: Just curious: Why the best? It uses a good number more lines than mine, though in terms of logic it's the same. –  David Robinson Aug 11 '12 at 1:30
    
@David His code worked just by copy pasting it and just by changing the filenames while yours didn't. It was an impulsive response. Nevermind :) –  crazyim5 Aug 13 '12 at 16:27

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