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I have two already-existing tables which look (in part) roughly like this:

CREATE TABLE parent (
    old_pk CHAR(8) NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY
) ENGINE=InnoDB;

CREATE TABLE child (
    parent_key CHAR(8),
    FOREIGN KEY (parent_key) REFERENCES parent(old_pk)
        ON UPDATE CASCADE ON DELETE CASCADE
) ENGINE=InnoDB;

I want to add a new auto-incrementing integer id column to parent and use it as the primary key instead, while still keeping old_pk as a unique key and allowing other tables like child to reference it in foreign key contraints. Unfortunately, simply saying ALTER TABLE parent DROP PRIMARY KEY doesn't work:

Error Code : 1025

Error on rename of './data/#sql-4013_70f5e' to './data/parent' (errno: 150)

Some googling suggests that this is due to the existing foreign key reference from child. In essence, I need a way to tell MySQL "use this other column as the primary key, but don't forget the unique-key-ness of the original one". Is there any way to accomplish this, other than just dropping the key constraints from child and reinstating them afterwards?

Assume that I must alter the tables in place, rather than creating copies with the same data and swapping them in later. I've tried using SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS = 0 before altering the table, but it does not seem to help.

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that's why i don't make user-visible primary key (i'm all for surrogate primary key from the get-go), user changing requirements are a headache, but it's good to know you're making your database use surrogate primary key en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surrogate_key –  Michael Buen Aug 5 '09 at 6:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Add an index (it could even be UNIQUE) to old_pk before dropping the primary key:

mysql> CREATE TABLE parent (
    ->     old_pk CHAR(8) NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY
    -> ) ENGINE=InnoDB;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)

mysql> CREATE TABLE child (
    ->     parent_key CHAR(8),
    ->     FOREIGN KEY (parent_key) REFERENCES parent(old_pk)
    ->         ON UPDATE CASCADE ON DELETE CASCADE
    -> ) ENGINE=InnoDB;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)

mysql> INSERT INTO parent VALUES ('a');
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.01 sec)

mysql> CREATE INDEX old_pk_unique ON parent (old_pk);
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.01 sec)
Records: 1  Duplicates: 0  Warnings: 0

mysql> ALTER TABLE parent DROP PRIMARY KEY;
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.01 sec)
Records: 1  Duplicates: 0  Warnings: 0

mysql> INSERT INTO child VALUES ('a');
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.00 sec)

mysql> SHOW CREATE TABLE parent;
+--------+------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| Table  | Create Table                                                                                                                 |
+--------+------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| parent | CREATE TABLE `parent` (
  `old_pk` char(8) NOT NULL,
  KEY `old_pk_unique` (`old_pk`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1 |
+--------+------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> INSERT INTO child VALUES ('b');
ERROR 1452 (23000): Cannot add or update a child row: a foreign key constraint fails (`test/child`, CONSTRAINT `child_ibfk_1` FOREIGN KEY (`parent_key`) REFERENCES `parent` (`old_pk`) ON DELETE CASCADE ON UPDATE CASCADE)

mysql> INSERT INTO parent VALUES ('b');
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.00 sec)

mysql> INSERT INTO child VALUES ('b');
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.01 sec)

mysql> ALTER TABLE parent ADD id INT;
Query OK, 2 rows affected (0.00 sec)
Records: 2  Duplicates: 0  Warnings: 0

mysql> UPDATE parent SET id = 1 WHERE old_pk = 'a';
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.01 sec)
Rows matched: 1  Changed: 1  Warnings: 0

mysql> UPDATE parent SET id = 2 WHERE old_pk = 'b';
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.00 sec)
Rows matched: 1  Changed: 1  Warnings: 0

mysql> ALTER TABLE parent ADD PRIMARY KEY (id);
Query OK, 2 rows affected (0.00 sec)
Records: 2  Duplicates: 0  Warnings: 0

mysql> SHOW CREATE TABLE parent;
+--------+------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| Table  | Create Table                                                                                                                                                                             |
+--------+------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| parent | CREATE TABLE `parent` (
  `old_pk` char(8) NOT NULL,
  `id` int(11) NOT NULL default '0',
  PRIMARY KEY  (`id`),
  KEY `old_pk_unique` (`old_pk`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1 |
+--------+------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)
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Doesn't work at all for me. –  Mr. Boy Dec 7 '12 at 21:28

I'll weigh in on this with what may be an unpopular suggestion. Don't use foreign key constraints in your database - enforce unique key and other constraints via TSQL in stored procedures as needed. It's my experience that in scaled environments check constraints are rarely used.

I say this with an open mind to opposing comments/discussion that may ensue. I'm not saying this suggestion is correct, just that it has been the prevailing opinion in the shops I've worked in.

A Request: If you downvote me, please also leave a short comment as well. In the 10 or so years I've been working with relational databases, the only people I know who use check constraints are working on systems that aren't at scale. If those are the people downvoting me then I can live with that. But if you're working on a scaled system and check constraints are the norm for you I'd like to know who you are so I can do some reading to see what I've missed.

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