Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am a beginner with trees and I was just trying to implement one for the first time and am generating the stackoverfloweror. I know its probably related to a bad recursion call however I dont see anything wrong with the recursion could I get a little help? The error is in this code.

     public void insert(Node node, String value)
{
    if((value.compareTo(node.getValue())) < 0)
    {
        if (node.left != null) 
        {
            insert(node.left, value);
        }
        else
            node.left = new Node(value);

    }
    else if((value.compareTo(node.getValue())) > 0)
    {
        if(node.right !=null)
        {
            insert(node.right, value);
        }
        else
            node.right= new Node(value);
    }
}

I call that method here

    public static void main(String[] args) throws FileNotFoundException, IOException {
    Tree dataTree = new  Tree(new Node("m"));


    File file = new File("C:\\randomdata.csv");

    BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(file));
    String line;

    while((line = br.readLine()) != null){
        if(line.toString().contains("zogeti"))
            break;
        else
        {
            dataTree.insert(dataTree.getRootElement(),line);
        }
    }

    br.close();
    }
share|improve this question
    
How many lines are in randomdata.csv, and are the lines in any particular order? –  xvtk Aug 10 '12 at 23:26
    
the file is 3260953 lines and they where initially sorted and then duplicated 5 times. I was able to do what I wanted to do using and array and arraylist I want to do it with a binary tree also so I can compare the efficiency times –  Will Jamieson Aug 10 '12 at 23:45
    
A simple binary tree has worst case behavior for content that is already sorted. See the bible (ie; Knuth) and try balanced trees. –  ddyer Aug 10 '12 at 23:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If the file is initially sorted, then this function looks like it will recurse N times for a file with N lines. Java doesn't implement tail recursion, so this is sure to be a real recursion. Rewrite it as a while loop instead of as a recursive function.

share|improve this answer

This would most likely occur if node.left == node or node.right == node or some other longer cycle in your tree.

In its current form, if the value was equal, it wouldn't trigger either if block, and would simply return (and return up the trace, as well) not adding anything. This means the cycle is probably occuring outside of this method.

You might find this bug in the only other place you're likely to create elements outside of the insert nethod: your constructor of your Tree class.

share|improve this answer

How big is this CSV file? Larger the file, deeper the recursion will be, leading to stackoverflow.

Try executing java with following command line parameters.

-Xms512m -Xmx512m

Also, what if the new line read from file is same as existing node value?

Following code will ignore that... (might be a requirement, I am just saying).

if((value.compareTo(node.getValue())) < 0)
{
    if (node.left != null) 
    {
        insert(node.left, value);
    }
    else
        node.left = new Node(value);

}
else if((value.compareTo(node.getValue())) > 0)
{
    if(node.right !=null)
    {
        insert(node.right, value);
    }
    else
        node.right= new Node(value);
}
share|improve this answer

If your file is 3260953 lines long and sorted that would certainly explain your problem. If the elements are in ascending sorted order, then every time insert inserts a new element, it gets placed on the right branch of each node every time. What you end up with is a string of 3260953 linearly linked nodes which your code accesses through as many recursive calls. This will overflow the stack. Try running on a MUCH smaller file and in scrambled alphabetical order.

Red-Black Trees avoid this issue by automatically balancing the tree by redistributing the elements. Coding up such a data structure isn't so straight-forward, however.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.