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I was wondering if it was possible to manually wake a perl script that has gone to sleep. Basically I set my script to sleep for say an hour after performing something, and 10 minutes later I realize I want it to run again.

The platform I'm running on is linux, with a tcsh shell.

Again, Thanks for any help

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How did you put it to sleep? –  Robert P Aug 10 '12 at 23:28
1  
What OS are we dealing with, here? –  Mark Johnson Aug 11 '12 at 0:41

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

On many systems, system calls like sleep can be interrupted with signals. On such an interruption, sleep will return the number of seconds that it actually slept for and set $!. Of course you have to use a signal that will allow your script to continue. If you haven't set any specific signal handler, a combination of SIGSTOP and SIGCONT will do the trick, too.

Example:

$ perl -e 'print "slept for ", sleep 1000, " seconds.\n";' &
[2] 6220
$ kill -STOP 6220
$ kill -CONT 6220
slept for 8 seconds[2]+  Stopped     perl -e ...

Another example (trivial SIGUSR1 handler):

$ perl -e '$SIG{USR1}=sub{}; print "slept for ", sleep 1000, "s.\n"' &
[1] 2419
$ kill -USR1 2419
slept for 4s
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What perl, what OS and what shell? Can you reproduce without another job in the background? (I see that your backgrounded perl is actually job no. 2 in your shell.) I cannot reproduce under v5.16, Linux 2.6 and bash — the sleep is unaffected by being STOPped and CONTinued, terminating after the appropriate number of seconds. Ancient Linux appeared to mishandle SIGCONT, and perl's "restartable syscall" semantics usually make interrupting a sleep non-trivial anyway. –  pilcrow Aug 12 '12 at 15:04
    
That test was with Cygwin, any version and any number of background jobs already running. I couldn't get my first example to work in Linux either, so I've added a second example that does work. –  mob Aug 12 '12 at 17:41
    
Thanks!! I was able to reproduce the manual waking on a Linus terminal. –  user1539348 Aug 13 '12 at 16:27

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