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I saw a piece of code that stuck me as odd. What does switch(!0) mean in javascript? What are some cases where this technique would be useful to use?

jsTree uses it in a few places but it looks foreign. I'm sure it has a good reason behind it, but can't figure it out.

http://www.jstree.com/

Here is a clip of code:

switch(!0) {
    case (!s.data && !s.ajax): throw "Neither data nor ajax settings supplied.";
    case ($.isFunction(s.data)): //...
                                 break;
}
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2  
Someone is trying to obfuscate their code I'd say. This is a hacky way to not use if and if else. –  Torsten Walter Aug 10 '12 at 23:41
    
Straight hipsta style yo. –  Drew Marsh Aug 10 '12 at 23:42
    
possible duplicate of What does !1 and !0 mean in Javascript? –  squint Aug 11 '12 at 0:00
1  
Because sensical code is too mainstream. Also, I say we should name these Yoda switches. –  Mahn Aug 11 '12 at 0:13
    
@Mahn HA! I am for the new term. +1 the comment if you like the new term "Yoda switches" –  MMeah Aug 12 '12 at 7:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

It's comparing each of the cases to boolean true.

Elaborating

case (!s.data && !s.ajax)

If !s.data && !s.ajax evaluates to true, then this case will be selected for execution.

switch(true) is the same as switch(!0)

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Please elaborate your answer –  MMeah Aug 10 '12 at 23:40
2  
Makes you wonder why they didn't just say switch (true)... –  cHao Aug 10 '12 at 23:40
2  
It won't be evaluated even then. Absent a break, return, or throw, the program will just fall through to the second case without bothering to check its associated condition. –  cHao Aug 10 '12 at 23:46
4  
!0 is 2 characters. true is 4. Super optimization! ;-) –  John Nelson Aug 10 '12 at 23:49
2  
@JohnNelson This is a nice proposal for JS minifiers to convert true to !0 and false to !1 ^_^ –  OnesimusUnbound Aug 10 '12 at 23:56

A switch(!0) is simply the same as switch(true).

This pattern:

switch (true) {
  case (condition): do something; break;
  case (condition): do something; break;
  case (condition): do something; break;
}

Works the same as:

if (condition) {
  do something;
} else if (condition) {
  do something;
} else if (condition) {
  do something;
}
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Except the if statement doesn't allow for fall through if the break is removed. –  MMeah Aug 10 '12 at 23:58
1  
@MMeah: Yes, that is true. That's doesn't mean that you should use it, though... :) –  Guffa Aug 11 '12 at 0:06

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