Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a multidiminsional array that I have created in php that is passed back to a jQuery script. I need to iterate through this array and process the data.

In Firebug I can see that the data is located at data.data.items. I've tried finding the length of the array using data.data.items.length, but it comes back as undefined. Interestingly, this worked prior to my php portion working correctly when it passed back an array of 8 empty items. Now that it's populated (and the indexes are strings), length doesn't work. There is also an object in each of the items. What's breaking this?

share|improve this question
    
could you paste some code? –  j-man86 Aug 11 '12 at 1:00
    
I would say the first place to start is that the syntax is different... "array(...)" in PHP and "[...]" in javascript. Without looking at any code I'd say you're going to have to do some conversion to get the array in the right format. –  j-man86 Aug 11 '12 at 1:02
add comment

2 Answers

An Array in JavaScript is an object nonetheless. When setting values using strings (or anything that isn't an integer), you are actually setting a property of the object (you are actually doing this when setting it with integer keys as well, but it's handled slightly differently).

To the issue of its sudden breakage after using strings as keys, I would expect that PHP realizes when you have an honest-to-goodness array versus an associative array, thus it sends arrays (surrounded by []) when all keys are integers, and objects (surrounded by {}) otherwise. I believe in the string-keyed case, PHP is generating objects, and thus .length becomes undefined (rather than 0 as in an empty array).

To answer your question, there is a simple way to count the "length" of this data:

var i = 0;
for (var item in data.data.items) {
    i++;
}

Which will iterate through each property of data.data.items and count them. Note that if you (or any library you include) adds a property to the Object prototype, this will not produce expected results. This is fairly uncommon, but you must be aware of it when using for..in.

You can address this by using the method Nagh suggested, which ignores properties not defined on that particular object:

var i = 0;
for (var item in data.data.items) {
    if(data.data.items.hasOwnProperty(item)) {
        i++;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is really good info, I am still kind of a js noob. And I was going to say - even before I read Nagh's response - that your for construct eliminates the need to know the length. Thanks so much. –  Rob Brandt Aug 11 '12 at 19:53
add comment

You can always use "foreach" kind of loop. In this case, you don't need to know what array length is there or even is it array or not, since you can iterate over object properties aswell.

As Joe already has pointed, javascript doesn't have associative arrays and when you trying to use one - you end up with object with properties. However, if u sure, that only properties this object got - is your array you can use code like that:

for (i in arr) {
  if (arr.hasOwnProperty(i)) {
    //do something with arr[i]
  }
}

However if you really need an array, consider using integer as an array index.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.