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Ok, here's a tricky one... I have one file1 and I want to create a file2 with just specific text from file1.

     random useless text 
     #START
     random IMPORTANT text
     #END 
     random useless text

     random useless text 
     #START
     random IMPORTANT text
     #END 
     random useless text

I want to extract the text in between the first pair of #START and #END (including the #'s), but ignore the second pair of #START and #END. Notice that the pair #START #END occurs twice in the same file. I just want what's between FIRST pair (including the #'s signs).

After it's all said and done, I should only have this literal results (from the first pair of #START #END only:

     #START
     random IMPORTANT text
     #END

In another post some one used:

sed -n "/this is token 1/,/this is token 2/p"

This was a method of removing the a single paired string "this is a token 1" and "this is a token 2"

But when I use "#START" and " #END" in this sed it preserves both pairs of #START and #END.

Note: What is in-between the first #START #END is always different than what's in-between the second pair of #START #END.

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What are tokens? How are they separated? – Alexander Putilin Aug 11 '12 at 1:57

I would use awk:

awk '/#START/{flag=1} flag{print} /#END/{exit}' your_file

Explanation:

  1. Set flag when current record matches the regex containing the beginning token.
  2. When flag is set, current record is printed
  3. When record matches ending token, program just exists, thus second copy isn't processed

Note: multiple awk rules can be applied to a record. Also note: depending on your task, you may need to adjust record separator RS and output record separator ORS, for example:

gawk -v RS='[[:space:]]+' -v ORS=' ' '/#START/{flag=1} flag{print} /#END/{exit}'

This sets record separator to arbitrary number of whitespace characters, and output record separator to just space. Thus, tokens are separated by whitespaces, and no exta possible info won't get into output. Compare, for example first version vs this version on such input:

blahblahblah #START
important text
#END blah blah blah
fdsfs

Consult official reference manual for gawk if needed: link

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This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed '/#START/,/#END/!d;/#END/q' file

Explanation:

  • /#START/,/#END/!d delete (do not print) anything that is not between #START and #END. This will only print between #START and #END
  • /#END/q quit but still print when you encounter #END
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