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Using the while loop, I wrote a procedure that takes as input a positive whole number, and prints out a multiplication table showing all the whole number multiplications up to and including the input number. The order in which the equations are printed matters.

for example, print_multiplication_table(2) gives:
1 * 1
1 * 2
2 * 1
2 * 2

This is my code:

def print_multiplication_table(n):
    a = 1
    b = 1
    while a <= n:
        while b <= n:
            print str(a) + " * " + str(b)
            b = b + 1
        a = a + 1

However, this doesn't seem to work as it only print out

1 * 1
1 * 2

Does anyone know why? thanks!

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1  
Is there a reason you are using a while rather than a for which would seem more appropriate here. Also, your indentation is still a bit off - the body of the function should be indented. –  Levon Aug 11 '12 at 1:20
1  
Please consider going back to some of the questions you have written in the past and marking any answer that helped you in solving problems as the "answer". –  Mark Hildreth Aug 11 '12 at 1:24
    
I would love to mark them but I don't see anywhere I can mark it.. I'm too noob tell me please –  user1561559 Aug 11 '12 at 1:28
1  
@user1561559 How to accept answers –  Levon Aug 11 '12 at 1:29
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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You need to initialize counter for inner loop before its execution

def print_multiplication_table(n):
    a = 1
    b = 1 # won't do harm, but doesn't really need now
    while a <= n:
        b = 1 # <-- note
        while b <= n:
            print str(a) + " * " + str(b)
            b = b + 1
        a = a + 1
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OHHH MYY MOTHERLORD OF GOD... THIS IS EXACTLY HOW IT SHOULD BE!! THANKS SO MUCH!!!! :D –  user1561559 Aug 11 '12 at 1:23
1  
I was happy to help! :) –  Alexander Putilin Aug 11 '12 at 1:24
    
but, in my code, even though I didn't initialize b inside of loop, it still prints out 1 * 1 and 1 * 2 .... and the only thing that didn't work was the value a, which is already initilized... can anyone explain me why? –  user1561559 Aug 11 '12 at 1:26
1  
The first iteration of the outer loop work correctly: the inner loop is executed. But the second iteration of the outer loop doesn't reinitialize b which is equals to n + 1 after inner loop execution. So the inner loop isn't executed(because guard condition b <= n is false) –  Alexander Putilin Aug 11 '12 at 1:29
2  
@Nya Why did you use a C++ comment in Python code? o_O –  Amber Aug 11 '12 at 1:32
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Easier still with a Python comprehension:

>>> print '\n'.join('{} * {}'.format(a,b) for a in range(1,6) for b in range(1,6))
1 * 1
1 * 2
1 * 3
1 * 4
1 * 5
2 * 1
# etc...

Or, if you want the terminal new line:

>>> gen=('{} * {}'.format(a,b) for a in range(1,6) for b in range(1,6))
>>> print '\n'.join(gen),'\n'

I used a separate gen expression just to more clear about the print with the comma. This also works:

>>> print '\n'.join('{} * {}'.format(a,b) for a in range(1,6) for b in range(1,6)),'\n'

There is no reason to do an explicit call to str in your code. If you don't, you can still use a and b as integers:

>>> gen=('{} * {} = {:2}'.format(a,b,a*b) for a in range(1,3) for b in range(1,4))
>>> print '\n'.join(gen),'\n'
1 * 1 =  1
1 * 2 =  2
1 * 3 =  3
2 * 1 =  2
2 * 2 =  4
2 * 3 =  6 
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2  
Could drop the brackets and use a genexp instead. This also has one minor quirk: there's no terminal \n, although that probably doesn't matter much. –  DSM Aug 11 '12 at 1:35
    
@DSM: Thanks! Done. –  dawg Aug 11 '12 at 1:53
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Consider using for in place of while:

def print_multiplication_table(n):
    for a in range(1, n+1):
        for b in range(1, n+1):
            print str(a) + " * " + str(b)

which gives:

1 * 1
1 * 2
2 * 1
2 * 2

Using for will automatically keep track of your counter variables and avoid the type of error you encountered (this of course doesn't mean you can't make errors with for-loops, but it's easier to avoid the type of error you had)

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+1: Obviously we were thinking alike ;-} –  dawg Aug 11 '12 at 1:35
    
@drewk It's all good .. –  Levon Aug 11 '12 at 1:36
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