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Using inequality operators, I have to define a procedure weekend which takes a string as its input, and returns the boolean True if it's 'Saturday' or 'Sunday' and False otherwise.

Here is my code

def weekend(day):
    if day != 'Saturday' or day != 'Sunday':
        return False
    else:
        return True

This seemingly returns False to every day, I don't know why, logically it would work..o_o.. can anyone please explain I'm too noob :S

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2  
By DeMorgan's: x != a or y != b is the same as !(x == a and y == b). It should be clear that, since x == y and a != b this creates a corundum: !(x == a and x == b) -> !(true and false) or !(false and true) -> !(false) -> true :) –  user166390 Aug 11 '12 at 5:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Fixed version:

if day != 'Saturday' and day != 'Sunday'

Better version:

return day in ['Saturday', 'Sunday']

Why or doesn't work:

When you use or, your condition would read something like "if today is not Saturday or today is not Sunday". Now replace "today" by "Saturday":

If Saturday is not Saturday or Saturday is not Sunday

The statement "Saturday is not Saturday" is obviously false and "Saturday is not Sunday" is obviously true, so the entire statement becomes "if false or true", which is always true.

Replace "today" by any other day and you will find that the sentence always evaluates to one of these sentences, which are always true:

if True or False  # day = Sunday
if False or True  # day = Saturday
if True or True   # any other day
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Indeed, the latter version if by far the clearest and most pythonic way to do it. –  Hugo Aug 11 '12 at 5:03
    
thanks for the answer, but can you tell me why 'or' doesn't work? –  user1561559 Aug 11 '12 at 5:10
    
@user1561559 I added an explanation of why 'or' does not work here. –  Paul Manta Aug 11 '12 at 5:22
    
thanks u so much!!! –  user1561559 Aug 11 '12 at 5:24
    
+1 for including explanation of problem and the "better version" way of doing it. (Beat me to the punch while I was writing out my long-winded answer haha.) –  Matthew Adams Aug 11 '12 at 5:40

The best way to deal with this, use something like this:

return day.lower() in ['saturday','sunday']
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You mean and

def weekend(day):
    if day != 'Saturday' and day != 'Sunday':
        return False
    else:
        return True

or the clearer version (which just applies De Morgan to the above):

def weekend(day):
    if day == 'Saturday' or day == 'Sunday':
        return True
    else:
        return False

The day will always be different from one of both days.

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1  
Reverse that! if day == 'Saturday' or day == 'Sunday': return True –  dawg Aug 11 '12 at 5:04
    
Indeed, by bad, I explained it right, but wrote the example wrong. Fixed. –  Hugo Aug 11 '12 at 5:05

Tip for the future: think through your code as if you were the computer in excruciating detail. For example, I would literally have this conversation with myself:

Hmm, when day = 'Saturday', the code is returning False even though I think it shouldn't. Let's see what's going on line-by-line.

def weekend(day):

  • Okay that seems good from now on I'll replace day with 'Saturday' anytime I see it...

if day != 'Saturday' or day != 'Sunday':

  • Okay so I'll mentally translate this to if 'Saturday' != 'Saturday' or 'Saturday' != 'Sunday': .
  • Now I'll simplify it by evaluating the comparisons.
    • 'Saturday' != 'Saturday' becomes False
    • 'Saturday' != 'Sunday': becomes True
  • Plugging those in, I see that the if statement is saying if False or True, which is the same as if True. So that means that day = Saturday leads to a return value of False .

Aha, so now I see what was wrong with the day = 'Saturday' case; the day != 'Sunday' condition meant that the if evaluated to True.

So while the code below would return True for day = 'Saturday',

def weekend(day):
    if day != 'Saturday':
        return False
    else:
        return True

and this code would work for day = 'Sunday',

def weekend(day):
    if day != 'Sunday':
        return False
    else:
        return True

the two cannot be combined with an or.

So try to talk to yourself like that in the future- it's super useful for debugging, especially when there is confusing boolean logic.

(For the record, I think that return day.lower() in ['saturday','sunday'] is the best way to approach this.)

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