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if (age > 40 && age < 60)

or

if (age > 40  & age < 60)

As you can see I am not sure if C++ uses two and signs or one.

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5  
Any C++ textbook or other reference should explain this. && is logical "and"; & is bitwise "and". –  Keith Thompson Aug 11 '12 at 5:11
    
I would suggest you to go through cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/operators –  JJPA Aug 11 '12 at 5:11
2  
C++ also provides and as an alternate way of spelling &&. (Really.) –  ephemient Aug 11 '12 at 5:27

3 Answers 3

The first one is the correct Logical AND if (age > 40 && age < 60)

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2  
In this case, & is the bitwise AND operator. –  Carl Norum Aug 11 '12 at 5:15
    
@CarlNorum fixed –  MimiEAM Aug 11 '12 at 5:17

Use this for the correct results:

if ((age > 40) && (age < 60))
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It's &&, single ampersand is a bitwise and function. In a lot of cases it may work out the same if you are using ints, but there will be other data types that cause problems.

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Even with ints it might cause problems, because the two operators have different precedence. Also & always evaluates both operands while && doesn't evaluate the rhs if the lhs is false. –  jahhaj Aug 11 '12 at 5:13
    
yes, that's quite key, & does not shortcut. –  Pork 'n' Bunny Aug 11 '12 at 6:46

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