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I have a select statement that shows a list of dynamic files ($list). I'd like to be able to input "1, 2, 3" and it will have file 1, file 2, and file 3 be selected. How do I modify this select (maybe even a different structure is needed) to allow multiple options to be selected?

select option in $list; do
        case $option in
            * )
                if [ "$option" ]; then
                    echo "Selected: " $option
                    break
                else
                    echo "Invalid input. Try again."
                fi;
        esac
    done
share|improve this question
    
Do you just want to add cases 1), 2), 3)? Or do you need something more complicated? – Carl Norum Aug 11 '12 at 5:43
    
It will be more complicated. $list contains all the files in a specific directory. Adding and removing files to the directory will change the case number. I rather not update the shell script each time. – wwwuser Aug 11 '12 at 5:46
2  
Perhaps you should consider another plan of attack, either using dialog or a more complex language. – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Aug 11 '12 at 6:21
    
You could possibly make pseudo-checkboxes using select but I think that's it. You're probably better off with dialog as @IgnacioVazquez-Abrams pointed out. – Michał Górny Aug 11 '12 at 9:10

This code doesn't use select , but does pretty much what you want-

#! /bin/bash
files=("file1" "file2" "file3" "file4" "Quit")

menuitems() {
    echo "Avaliable options:"
    for i in ${!files[@]}; do
        printf "%3d%s) %s\n" $((i+1)) "${choices[i]:- }" "${files[i]}"
    done
    [[ "$msg" ]] && echo "$msg"; :
}

prompt="Enter an option (enter again to uncheck, press RETURN when done): "
while menuitems && read -rp "$prompt" num && [[ "$num" ]]; do
    [[ "$num" != *[![:digit:]]* ]] && (( num > 0 && num <= ${#files[@]} )) || {
        msg="Invalid option: $num"; continue
    }
    if [ $num == ${#files[@]} ];then
      exit
    fi
    ((num--)); msg="${files[num]} was ${choices[num]:+un-}selected"
    [[ "${choices[num]}" ]] && choices[num]="" || choices[num]="x"
done

printf "You selected"; msg=" nothing"
for i in ${!files[@]}; do
    [[ "${choices[i]}" ]] && { printf " %s" "${files[i]}"; msg=""; }
done
echo "$msg"

Demo-

$ ./test.sh
Avaliable options:
  1 ) file1
  2 ) file2
  3 ) file3
  4 ) file4
  5 ) Quit
Enter an option (enter again to uncheck, press RETURN when done): 1
Avaliable options:
  1x) file1
  2 ) file2
  3 ) file3
  4 ) file4
  5 ) Quit
file1 was selected
Enter an option (enter again to uncheck, press RETURN when done): 2
Avaliable options:
  1x) file1
  2x) file2
  3 ) file3
  4 ) file4
  5 ) Quit
file2 was selected
Enter an option (enter again to uncheck, press RETURN when done): 3
Avaliable options:
  1x) file1
  2x) file2
  3x) file3
  4 ) file4
  5 ) Quit
file3 was selected
Enter an option (enter again to uncheck, press RETURN when done): 1
Avaliable options:
  1 ) file1
  2x) file2
  3x) file3
  4 ) file4
  5 ) Quit
file1 was un-selected
Enter an option (enter again to uncheck, press RETURN when done): 
You selected file2 file3
share|improve this answer
    
When you prompt for "Enter an option", I'm looking to be able to input: "1, 2, 3" and it output, "You selected file1, file2, file3." Your code only allows you to select one option at a time then prompt the user again. I'm looking for one prompt and to be able to input multiple options. – wwwuser Aug 12 '12 at 4:11
    
If u are looking for that specific reqmt then i think you are better off with dialog. The input you are suggesting "1, 2, 3" could be too much error prone, i.e. user could enter "123", "1,23", "111", "1 2 3" etc. etc. and the code will spend more time parsing through and validating that rather than doing actual work. You would probably end up creating a huge regular expression "trap" which would be difficult to read, understand, and maintain. – Annjawn Aug 12 '12 at 5:40

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