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How do you pass an array to a function where that function can edit it's contents?

like when doing

function(int *x)
 {*x = 10;}

main()
  {int x;
   function(&x);}

how could i do the same using a character array?

whenever I do

   function(char *array[], int *num)
   { int x = *num;
     *array[x] = 'A'; }

   main()
   { char this[5] = "00000"; //not a string
     int x = 3;
     function(&this, &x); }

DEV C++ says

[Warning] passing arg 1 of `function' from incompatible pointer type 

obviously I did something wrong, so please tell me how to fix that. Thanks :D

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1  
RE: your formatting: MY EYES! THE GOGGLES, THEY DO NOTHING! –  tbert Aug 11 '12 at 5:28
    
possible duplicate of C++ passing an array pointer as a function argument –  Paul R Aug 11 '12 at 5:45
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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should write:

void function(char array[], int *num)
{
   int x = *num;
   array[x] = 'A';
}

void main()
{
   char my_array[5] = "00000";
   int x = 3;
   function(my_array, &x);
}

Notation char *array[] is an array of pointers that you do not need here.

When you pass an array somewhere, you should not take its address. Arrays are adjusted to pointers by default.

EDIT:

Function prototypes:

void function(char array[], int *num);
void function(char *array, int *num);

are absolutely identical. There is no even minor difference between them.

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So after running 'function' the array in main will have its contents changed? –  Dan Joseph Porcioncula Aug 11 '12 at 5:34
    
Yes, Address of that array is passed to the function. The function modifies piece of memory that this address is pointing to. –  Kirill Kobelev Aug 11 '12 at 5:38
    
thank you very much :D –  Dan Joseph Porcioncula Aug 11 '12 at 5:41
    
so what i was doing is like function (char **array) but i only pas &array?? –  Dan Joseph Porcioncula Aug 11 '12 at 5:42
    
In C/C++ array and &array is the same thing. This is not logical at all and I do not like this, but the language is defined this way. –  Kirill Kobelev Aug 11 '12 at 5:44
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Since arrays can only be passed by address, you don't really want a char * array here, just a char array:

rettype function(char *array, int *num)
{
    array[*num] = 'A';
}

int main()
{
    char arr[] = "1234567890";
    int i = 2;
    function(arr, &i);
}
share|improve this answer
    
So after running 'function' arr in main will have its contents changed? –  Dan Joseph Porcioncula Aug 11 '12 at 5:36
    
@DanJosephPorcioncula yes –  user529758 Aug 11 '12 at 5:59
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In C, array names "devolve" to a pointer to the head of the array, by passing "&array", you're passing a pointer to a pointer to the head of the array, thus the warning.

char array[512];

myfunc(array, foo);

is the proper way to do what you want.

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2  
" by passing "&array", you're passing a pointer to a pointer to the head of the array, thus the warning." - This is wrong. Taking the address of an array produces a pointer to an array, not a pointer to pointer to whatever the array type is –  Ed S. Aug 11 '12 at 5:39
    
I was unaware "array" was a C datatype. –  tbert Aug 11 '12 at 8:09
    
c-faq.com/aryptr/aryptrequiv.html –  Ed S. Aug 11 '12 at 17:56
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Actually you have taken one dimension array. So you can define function in two ways...

(i)

 function(char array[], int *num)
       { int x = *num;
         *array[x] = 'A'; }

       main()
       { char this[5] = "00000"; //not a string
         int x = 3;
         function(this, &x); }

and

(ii)

function(char *array, int *num)
       { int x = *num;
         *array[x] = 'A'; }

       main()
       { char this[5] = "00000"; //not a string
         int x = 3;
         function(this, &x); }

But in your function definition, you wrote *array[] as argument which means the array is two dimensional array. So you should declare array as two dimensional array.

function(char *array[], int *num)
       { int x = *num;
        //implement your code }

       main()
       { char this[5][10];
         // you can initialize this array.
         int x = 3;
         function(this, &x); }

I think it will be helpful to you.

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Okay, the first thing to remember is that there's no such thing as a pointer "to an array" although you'll hear that said fairly often. It's sloppy.

(As pointed out below, the terminology "pointer to an array" does strictly have a meaning -- but I maintain that you've been confused by it. What really happens is that every pointer contains an address. Depending on the declaration, the compiler can identify if it's being used correctly in context, and that's what your error message is really telling you: what you declared in the function is a pointer to an array of chars, which is to say the same thing as a char **, instead of a char *, which is what you're passing. But char *, or char **, or char ******, the important point is that you're making it too complex -- you already have the address you need identified by the array name.)

Pointers is pointers, they're addresses.

An array in C is simply an allocated chunk of memory, and it's name represents the address of the first element. So

char a[42];

is a block of memory 42 char's long, and a is its address.

You could rewrite your second function as

void foo(char* a, int num){ // (3)
     // notice that you don't need the word function and 
     // for lots of reasons I wouldn't use it  as a function name.
     a[num] = 'A'; // (4)
}

int main(){
      // Sadly "00000" IS a string no matter what your comment
      // says.  Use an array initializer instead.

      char arry[5] = {'0','0','0','0','0' } ; // (1)
      foo(arry,3); // (2)
}

This does what I believe your code means to do. Note that

(1) Since "00000" really is a string, it's actually creating an array 6 elements long which could have been initialized with the array initializer

{'0','0','0','0','0', 0 }

(2) The array (which I named 'arry' instead of 'this' since 'this' is often a keyword in C-like languages, why risk confusion?) is already an address (but not a pointer. It can be on the right-hand side of an assignment to a pointer, but not on the left hand side.)

So when I call

foo(arry,3);

I'm calling foo with the address of the first element of arry, and the number 3 (you don't need to declare a variable for that.)

Now, I could have also written it as

foo(&arry[0],3);

You would read that as "find the 0-th element of arry, take its address." It is an identity in C that for any array

char c[len];

the expression c and &c[0] refer to the same address.

(3) that could also be defined as foo(char arry[], int num). Those are equivalent.

(4) and when you refer to a[num] you're referring directly to the num-th element of the memory pointed to by a, which is at the address of the start of the array arry. You don't need all that dereferencing.

Don't be disturbed that this is a little hard to follow -- it's tough for everyone when they start C.

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3  
"Okaym, the first thing to remember is that there's no such thing as a pointer "to an array"" - that is incorrect. There most certainly is a such thing as a pointer to array, -1. Pointer to array: char (*ptoarr)[10]. ptoarr is a pointer to array of 10 char. Taking the address of an array also produces a pointer to an array. Arrays are a fully fledged type, they are not simply pointers in disguise. –  Ed S. Aug 11 '12 at 5:35
    
Yeah, yeah, and insisting on that bit of pedantry has been confusing newbies for the 30 years i've been teaching C. But that thing is still simply an address; in this example, feeling that he needed a "pointer to the array" led him into the notion he needed char * arry[] instead of char *. –  Charlie Martin Aug 11 '12 at 5:49
3  
It's not pedantry though, it is the way that the language works. Arrays are a real type, not hidden pointers. It is a very common misconception and it just doesn't need to be. Also, to say that "there's no such thing as a pointer "to an array"" is just wrong. However... I think I've made more than enough comments here to make the OP aware. I don't think you deserve the downvote for just that after your edit, so removed. –  Ed S. Aug 11 '12 at 5:52
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Firstly dont use this as a variable name, its a C++ keyword. Sorry didnt realise it was a C question.

main()
{ 
  char foo[5] = "00000"; //not a string
  int x = 3;
  function(foo, &x); 
}

You dont take the memory address of foo. foo when used in a pointer-accepting context degrades into a pointer to the first element. *foo is the same as foo[0] which is the same as *(foo + 0)

enter image description here

like wise foo[3] is the same as *(foo + 3) (the compiler takes care of multiplying the element size).

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1  
"Firstly dont use this as a variable name, its a C++ keyword." - this is a C question, though it is probably good advice either way in case the code comes under the purview of a C++ compiler some day. However, foo is emphatically not already a pointer to the first element. It is an array. Teaching beginners that arrays and pointers are the same thing is a terrible idea, -1. It would also not be the same thing as foo[0]. Did you mean &foo[0]? –  Ed S. Aug 11 '12 at 5:43
    
@EdS. didn't realise this was C only until your comment. Surely my response doesnt deserve a downvote. Effort and caution gets you downvotes. Awesome. –  Preet Kukreti Aug 11 '12 at 5:46
2  
No, but saying that pointers and arrays are the same thing do. Pointers are not the same thing as arrays and they never have been. This is one of the most common misconceptions I see around here. The correct answer is that arrays decay to pointer types when needed, but they are certainly not pointers. –  Ed S. Aug 11 '12 at 5:47
    
@EdS. Okay Ill give you that I forgot to mention the indirection part in the equality explanation. That was a genuine mistake, and I have now modified it. –  Preet Kukreti Aug 11 '12 at 5:49
    
Downvote removed, though this is still very misleading and untrue: "since it is already a pointer pointing to the first element." It is not a pointer. –  Ed S. Aug 11 '12 at 5:50
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