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I have 2 methods in a source file:

def Foo
  puts "hello"
  puts "bar" 
end 

def Bar
  puts "hello"
  puts "bar" 
end

I would like to swap the order of the methods, so Bar is first.

Assuming the cursor is on the d in def Foo, the simple way is to:

shift v -> jjjj -> d -> jjj -> p -> O -> esc 

But that feels a little long winded and does not account well for arbitrarily long methods:

What is the most efficient way to do this in Vim, keystroke wise?

EDIT Keep in mind, I would like the solution to account for a situation where the methods are in a context of a big class, so G is probably best avoided

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6 Answers 6

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Assuming the cursor is somewhere in the first method, press dap}p and they should be swapped.

What dap does is simply "delete a paragraph". Try :help object-select to learn other way of deleting/selecting text objects in VIM.

EDIT: Replaced G with } in the command.

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You, sir, just blew my mind :) –  johnw188 Jul 27 '09 at 23:52
    
+1 for complete awesomeness, is there a way to solve this without the G key? so it works in context of a big class –  Sam Saffron Jul 27 '09 at 23:55
    
wow :) –  Luke Schafer Jul 27 '09 at 23:56
2  
You can use dap}p (replace G with } to move to the next method instead of the end of the file, and thus handle the situation where there is more code after the second method. –  spatz Jul 28 '09 at 0:01
2  
Explaining dap: The 'a' character, in visual mode or after an operator, allows you to select an object. p stands for paragraph, so dap = delete a paragraph. You could say das to delete a sentence, and so on. Look up text object selection in vim help for more. –  johnw188 Jul 28 '09 at 0:06

Similar to Spatz's

d}}p

delete to the next blank line (below Foo), skip to the next blank line (below Bar), paste.

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A couple of ways off the top of my head. You could say

5dd/end[enter key]pO

Deletes five lines, searches for end, places the lines underneath, adds a space.

If you have VimRuby installed, I believe you can use % to jump between def and end. In that case, you could say

v%x5jpO

Edit: I defer to spatz on this :P

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Found another method ( from godlygeek on #vim ):

with:

def function():
    first
    first
    first

def lol():
    second
    second
    second

From line 1, count up until the 'def lol', which is 5. Then:

:1,5m$
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personally, I would go '4dd' then down under bar and press 'p', but I'm not a vim guru

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From line 1, 5ddGp , or 5dd:5p is the most concise/shortest I can think of.

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any way to avoid the line counting in the head problem? –  Sam Saffron Jul 27 '09 at 23:49

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