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I have a JComboBox with many items. I added an item listener to this combo box which stores the selected item:

    comboBox.addItemListener(new ItemListener() {

        @Override
        public void itemStateChanged(ItemEvent e) {
            option = (String) e.getItem();
        }
    });

I have a button and when it is clicked, the program carries out the task on the basis of that selection.

Button:

public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
  if (option.toLowerCase().compareTo("contrast stretching") == 0) { /* do sth */ } 
  else if (option.toLowerCase().compareTo("mean") == 0){ /* do sth else */ }
  // And many other else if statements

The actionPerformed function is way too long. What is the best way to write the code? I don't want to make single function too long.

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can create an interface (e.g. Task) representing the task that needs to be executed. Then create an implementation of this interface for each of the values in the combo box (ContrastTask, MeanTask, ...). Finally, in your actionPerformed, write a factory method returning the correct implementation - it will be basically a "switch" returning the correct instance of Task. Then you can just run this task...

Task might look like this:

public interface Task {
  [whatever result it should return] execute([whatever parameters it needs]);
}

On of the implementations might look like this:

public class MeanTask implements Task {
  public int execute(int a, int b) {
    return (a + b) / 2;
  }
}

Your factory will look like this:

private Task create(String option) {
  if (option.toLowerCase().compareTo("mean") == 0) {
    return new MeanTask();
  }
  else if ....
}

The advantage of this is that the logic of each task is nicely encapsulated in its own class.

share|improve this answer
    
The tasks I need to write are very short (3-4) lines of code. Should I make new "class" for each task? Isn't that too many classes? – coolscitist Aug 11 '12 at 9:05
    
@Robik you don't have much choice, if you want to make the method shorter. Also, this separation will help you if the code evolves and it's suddenly more than 3-4 lines:) – vektor Aug 11 '12 at 9:08
    
@zip: Yes I want to make changes to the GUI (Changing the BufferedImage which is displayed in a panel). I have never used SwingWorker. I really didn't get the SwingWorker.invokeLater() part.. What am I supposed to write in the run() function? How will it better organize the code? – coolscitist Aug 11 '12 at 9:11
    
@Robik: I told nonsense. You only need to use SwingWorker if you perform a long running task (e.g. a full hdd scan) which takes several minutes. If your code in your method is going to be very fast you do not need any extra stuff to consider. But this is not the case in your scenario. I misunderstood your question. I'm sorry for that. – zip Aug 11 '12 at 9:14
1  
Using reflection API is really weird in this case. You shouldn't make your approach difficult. – Evgenyx Aug 11 '12 at 9:21

This can help you:

public class Main {
  private Map<String, BaseStrategy> strategyMap = new HashMap<String, BaseStrategy>();

  {
    strategyMap.put("case1", new Strategy1());
    strategyMap.put("case2", new Strategy2());
    strategyMap.put("case3", new Strategy3());
  }

  //...

  public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
    strategyMap.get(option.toLowerCase()).processEvent();
  }

  abstract class BaseStrategy {

    public abstract void processEvent();

  }

  class Strategy1 extends BaseStrategy {

    @Override
    public void processEvent() {
      //case 1
    }
  }

  class Strategy2 extends BaseStrategy {

    @Override
    public void processEvent() {
      //case 2
    }
  }

  class Strategy3 extends BaseStrategy {

    @Override
    public void processEvent() {
      //case 3
    }
  }
}

You can make a map where the key is a string that defines your command and the value is a strategy that processes your event. Now you can place your processing code even to other java files and process event with only 1 line of code.


Actually if you have too many cases - Map is a way better than if-else-if-... Map will find a proper strategy a way faster - O(ln n) instead of O(n).

share|improve this answer
    
The classes I need (the ones you are extending from BaseStrategy) are going to be very short, just 3-4 lines. But the number of classes I need would be very large. Also, the class has just one function. Is this the way professionals do it? I mean is it the standard way of doing it? – coolscitist Aug 11 '12 at 9:08
    
Yes it is pretty normal to create classes as much as you want. Usually you would create an anonymous class for these scenarios new Task() { /*my implementation*/}without defining a explicit class. – zip Aug 11 '12 at 9:13
1  
There is no standard way - all depends on requirements. If you can't make your logic universal (I mean make 1 function with parameters) you will have to write this code somewhere. In Win32API people write long switch that handles system messages. All depends on style and requirements. Personally I don't see anything bad in making a package with all these strategies. It allows you to extend your logic pretty easy. – Evgenyx Aug 11 '12 at 9:16
1  
Actually if you have too many cases - map is a way better than if-else-if-... Map will find a proper strategy a way faster - O(ln n) instead of O(n). – Evgenyx Aug 11 '12 at 9:24
    
Ok. So, I will use Map too. Thanks – coolscitist Aug 11 '12 at 9:29

As vektor and Eugene posted I would combine both solutions to something like this:

public interface Task {
  [whatever result it should return] execute([whatever parameters it needs]);
}

//call this method in your constructor
private void initTasks() {
    this.tasks.put("option1", new Task() {
                public int execute(int a, int b) {
                   return (a + b) / 2;
                }
          });
    //init more tasks
    //this.task.put(..., ...);
}

protected Task getTask(String option) {
     return this.task(option);
}   
share|improve this answer
1  
Problem with this is obvious: your initTasks() is even longer than the original method! Remember, the assignment was to make it shorter;) – vektor Aug 11 '12 at 9:24

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