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Let's say I have an int array:

var source = new int[] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 };

I want to replace a portion of it using these arrays:

var fromArray = new int[] { 1, 2 };
var toArray = new int[] { 11, 12 };

The output I need to produce using the arrays above is: 11, 12, 3, 4, 5.

In a more advanced scenario, I may also need to replace the source using multiple arguments. Think that fromArray and toArray are coming from a Dictionary<int[], int[]>:

IEnumerable<T> Replace(IEnumerable<T> source,
                       IDictionary<IEnumerable<T>, IEnumerable<T>> values)
{
    // "values" parameter holds the pairs that I want to replace.
    // "source" can be `IList<T>` instead of `IEnumerable<T> if an indexer
    // is needed but I prefer `IEnumerable<T>`.
}

How can I achieve this?

Edit: The order of the items is important. Think it like String.Replace; if the whole content of the fromArray doesn't exist in source (if the source has only 1 and not 2, for example) the method shouldn't try to replace it. An example:

var source = new int[] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 };
var dict = new Dictionary<int[], int[]>();

// Should work, since 1 and 2 are consecutive in the source.
dict[new int[] { 1, 2 }] = new int[] { 11, 12 }; 

// There is no sequence that consists of 4 and 6, so the method should ignore it.
dict[new int[] { 4, 6 }] = new int[] { 13, 14 };

// Should work.
dict[new int[] { 5, 6 }] = new int[] { 15, 16 };

Replace(source, dict); // Output should be: 11, 12, 3, 4, 15, 16
share|improve this question
    
PS, your signature isn't quite right, change values to have keys of IEnumerable<int> – M Afifi Aug 11 '12 at 9:10
    
@MAfifi - I don't get it, why? – Şafak Gür Aug 11 '12 at 9:13
    
You're going to try and index an array with type T. That won't work because the indexer will always expect it to be an int. See my example below. – M Afifi Aug 11 '12 at 9:25
    
Very inefficient and ugly way but works => convert lists to string and use string.Replace. var dest = String.Join("", source.Select(x => "[" + x + "]")) .Replace(String.Join("", fromArray.Select(x => "[" + x + "]")), String.Join("", toArray.Select(x => "[" + x + "]"))) .Split(new char[]{'[',']'},StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries) .Select(x => Int32.Parse(x)) .ToArray(); – L.B Aug 11 '12 at 9:29
    
Will fromArray and toArray always have a Length of two? After your edit, it looks like it could become important what order all the replacing is done in. However, the order of a Dictionary<,> is not well defined. – Jeppe Stig Nielsen Aug 11 '12 at 9:33
up vote 1 down vote accepted

OK, here's an answer based on your edited question. Completely untested of course.

static IEnumerable<T> Replace<T>(IEnumerable<T> source, IDictionary<IEnumerable<T>, IEnumerable<T>> values)
{
  foreach (var kvp in values)
    source = ReplaceOne(source, kvp.Key, kvp.Value);
  return source;
}

static IEnumerable<T> ReplaceOne<T>(IEnumerable<T> source, IEnumerable<T> fromSeq, IEnumerable<T> toSeq)
{
  var sArr = source.ToArray();

  int replLength = fromSeq.Count();
  if (replLength != toSeq.Count())
    throw new NotSupportedException();

  for (int idx = 0; idx <= sArr.Length - replLength; idx++)
  {
    var testSeq = Enumerable.Range(idx, replLength).Select(i => sArr[i]);
    if (testSeq.SequenceEqual(fromSeq))
    {
      Array.Copy(toSeq.ToArray(), 0, sArr, idx, replLength);
      idx += replLength - 1;
    }
  }

  return sArr;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Seems nice, converting source to array and counting the values each time may hit the performance but like I said, I can use IList<T> instead of IEnumerable<T> if the Count and indexers are needed. I'll give it a try as soon as I can. – Şafak Gür Aug 11 '12 at 10:21
    
If replLength may be zero, you should put the for loop into an if (replLength != 0) block. – Jeppe Stig Nielsen Aug 11 '12 at 10:26
    
Also note, you might not be able to know in what order the foreach runs through the IDictionary<,>. If source is a,b,c and one replacement is a→m and another replacement is c→a (or a→k), then the order of the replacements matters. And you can't control that order well with a standard Dictionary<,>. – Jeppe Stig Nielsen Aug 11 '12 at 10:33
    
I thought Dictionary<T,T> iterates like List<T>, thanks for the info. Well, I may use IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<T,T>> as the parameter type. Users of the method may want to use List<KeyValuePair<T,T>> e.t.c. depending on their needs. – Şafak Gür Aug 11 '12 at 10:42

If you love linq :)

var replaced = source.Zip(fromArray.Zip(toArray, (x, y) => new {From = x, To = y}),
                                      (x, y) => new {Src = x, Dest = y}).
                Select(x => x.Src == x.Dest.From ? x.Dest.To : x.Src);
share|improve this answer
    
Have you tried to compile your code? – L.B Aug 11 '12 at 9:13
    
@L.B, just tried. Sorry, gonna fix – 2kay Aug 11 '12 at 9:14
IEnumerable<T> Replace(IEnumerable<T> source,
    IDictionary<IEnumerable<int>, IEnumerable<T>> values) 
{ 
    // "values" parameter holds the pairs that I want to replace. 
    // "source" can be `IList<T>` instead of `IEnumerable<T> if an indexer 
    // is needed but I prefer `IEnumerable<T>`.

    IList<T> sourceAsList = source as IList<T>;
    if (sourceAsList == null)
    {
        sourceAsList = source.ToList();
    }

    foreach (var kvp in values)
    {
        // repeat same thing as above.
    }
} 
share|improve this answer

If you need to support general IEnumerable<T> (instead of arrays T[]), maybe something like:

IEnumerable<T> Replace<T>(IEnumerable<T> source, IEnumerable<T> fromSeq, IEnumerable<T> toSeq)
{
  var dict = fromSeq.Zip(toSeq, (fr, to) => new { Fr = fr, To = to })
    .ToDictionary(a => a.Fr, a => a.To);

  foreach (var s in source)
  {
    T replace;
    if (dict.TryGetValue(s, out replace))
      yield return replace;
    else
      yield return s;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, didn't see your edit about consecutive elements in source. – Jeppe Stig Nielsen Aug 11 '12 at 9:27

I think it will work corretly,

    void Replace<T>(ref T[] source, IDictionary<T[], T[]> values)
    {
        int start = 0;
        int index = -1;
        foreach (var item in values)
        {
            start = 0;

            while ((index = IndexOfSequence<T>(source, item.Key, start)) >= 0)
            {
                for (int i = index; i < index + item.Key.Length; i++)
                {
                    source[i] = item.Value[i - index];
                }

                start = index + item.Key.Length + 1;
            }
        }
    }

    public int IndexOfSequence<T>(T[] source, T[] sequence, int start)
    {
        int j = -1;

        if (sequence.Length == 0)
            return j;

        for (int i = start; i < source.Length; i++)
        {
            if (source[i].Equals(sequence[0]) && source.Length >= i + sequence.Length)
            {
                for (j = i + 1; j < i + sequence.Length; j++)
                {
                    if (!source[j].Equals(sequence[j - i]))
                        break;
                }

                if (j - i == sequence.Length)
                    return i;
            }
        }

        return -1;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
This is good. If source has repetitions, this solution only replaces one element in source for each i. – Jeppe Stig Nielsen Aug 11 '12 at 9:05

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