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I would like to use ghostscript to convert the pdf source into series of jpeg images. Everything works fine except:

  • The format specifiers (%d) for .jpeg output file names are not working on Windows (I am using Windows 7 64bit), so I need to call gswin64c.exe as for every single page.
  • The exported .jpeg files have white stripes around the page, while .pdf does not have anything there – can I get somehow rid of them?

My command line:

gswin64c.exe \
   -dSAFER -dBATCH -dNOPAUSE \
   -sDEVICE=jpeg \
   -r350 \
   -dJPEGQ=100 \
   -dFirstPage=1 -dLastPage=1 \
   -sOutputFile=magazine-1.jpg \
     magazine.pdf
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Can you provide a (link to a) sample PDF page exhibiting this behavior? Without a sample it's not possible to tell for sure the cause of your white strips, nor to show a way to avoid it. –  Kurt Pfeifle Aug 24 '12 at 9:14

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted
  1. On Windows, you have to double the % character for the format specifier to get the page number increment:

    gswin64c.exe \
         -o magazine-page_%%04d.jpg \
         -sDEVICE=jpeg \
         -r350 \
         -dJPEGQ=100 \
          magazine.pdf
    

  2. Without seeing your PDF, I cannot tell for sure where your white strips come from.

    So, just theorizing: Usually, what appears in PDF pages (viewed in a PDF reader or printed on paper) as a white background in reality is a transparent background. (You can make transparent areas visible in Acrobat Reader: go to Preferences... -> Page display and activate the checkbox Show transparency grid.

    JPEG does not know about transparency and converts all fully transparent areas to white.

    You could trim the white areas off with the help of ImageMagick. Or, if you know the exact widths of each of the strips (and the PDF page dimensions), you could tell Ghostscript via additional commandline parameters to trim away these...

    You could also convert to PNG, which supports transparency:

    gswin64c.exe \
         -o magazine-page_%%04d.png \
         -sDEVICE=pngalpha \
         -r350 \
          magazine.pdf
    
    Note, that there will still be stripes around the page image -- however they will be transparent instead of white.

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3  
Most likely the white borders are the difference between the mediabox (which GS uses) and the CropBox (which viewers use). You can use -dUseCropBox to tell GS to use the CropBox instead of the MediaBox. You shouldn't need toe double the '%' unless you are calling GS from a batch file, on the command line '%d' should work just fine. A sample PDF ilfe, version of GS being used, would help –  KenS Aug 11 '12 at 19:48

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