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I'm writing a program that needs to do a lot of string formatting and I have noticed that .format() is taking a small but significant amount of cpu time. Here's how I'm using it:

str = 'vn {0:.15f} {1:.15f} {2:.15f}\n'.format(normal_array[i].x, normal_array[i].y, normal_array[i].z)

Does anyone know if there is even a slightly faster way to do this as a small fraction X 100000 can add up

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+1 well stated problem –  msw Aug 11 '12 at 12:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Try to replace .format with % expression and pre-calculate normal_array:

item = normal_array[i]
'vn %.15f %.15f %.15f\n' % (item.x, item.y, item.z)

Also replacing indexes with iteration over values can slightly improve speed:

for item in normal_array:
    'vn %.15f %.15f %.15f\n' % (item.x, item.y, item.z)

Benchmark:

def gen_data(n):
    l = []
    for k in xrange(n):
        l.append(collections.namedtuple('normal', ('x', 'y', 'z'))(random.random(), random.random(), random.random()))
    return l

if __name__ == '__main__':
    times = 1000
    print 'format:'
    print timeit.Timer('for i in xrange(len(normal_array)):\n    str = "vn {0:.15f} {1:.15f} {2:.15f}\\n".format(normal_array[i].x, normal_array[i].y, normal_array[i].z)\n',
            'from __main__ import gen_data; normal_array = gen_data(1000)').timeit(times)
    print '%s:'
    print timeit.Timer('for i in xrange(len(normal_array)):\n    str = "vn %.15f %.15f %.15f\\n".format(normal_array[i].x, normal_array[i].y, normal_array[i].z)\n',
            'from __main__ import gen_data; normal_array = gen_data(1000)').timeit(times)
    print '%s+iteration:'
    print timeit.Timer('for o in normal_array:\n    str = "vn %.15f %.15f %.15f\\n".format(o.x, o.y, o.z)\n',
            'from __main__ import gen_data; normal_array = gen_data(1000)').timeit(times)

Results (lower is better)

format:
5.34718108177
%s:
1.30601406097
%s+iteration:
1.23484301567
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1  
+1 for factoring out the common expression lookup. 'twill be slightly faster as the question requested, but float-to-ascii dominates in the little test I ran and there's really no getting around that assuming no repetition among values to be formatted. –  msw Aug 11 '12 at 11:44

Also you can try to migrate to PyPy, there was an article about string formatting comparison in cpython and PyPy.

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It is not clear that this is as applicable to the stated problem. The cited article concentrates on memory allocation for integer formatting. While I don't dispute the conclusions of the article, my guess is that float to ascii will dominate over allocation costs. Profiling as @Vladimir has done is the only way to know. –  msw Aug 11 '12 at 14:36
    
it's not completely clear what in formatting is actually a performance bottleneck. PyPy's approach will yield faster results one way or another, but how much faster they actually become is up to measurments only. –  fijal Aug 13 '12 at 19:09

Try this (old school) approach by replacing .format() with % format directives:

str = 'vn %.15f %.15f %.15f\n' % (normal_array[i].x, normal_array[i].y, normal_array[i].z )          

Seems using % will be faster:

timeit str='%.15f %.15f %.15f\n' % (a, b, c)
100000 loops, best of 3: 4.99 us per loop

timeit str2='{:.15f} {:.15f} {:.15f}\n'.format(a, b, c)
100000 loops, best of 3: 5.97 us per loop

Python v 2.7.2 under XP SP2, variables a, b, and c are floats.

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If the float conversion is still a bottleneck, you might try to farm the formatting out to a multiprocessing.Pool, and use multiprocessing.map_async or multiprocessing.imap to print the resulting string. This will use all the cores on your machine to do the formatting. Although it could be that the overhead from passing the data to and from the different processes masks the improvents from parallelizing the formatting.

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