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So I have read this article C# Overloads which says that you can use overloaded methods to eliminate complexity and enhance performance and they provide the following example:

using System;

class Program
{
    public static void Main()
    {
    ShowString(string.Empty);
    ShowString("Category");
    }

    static void ShowString(string value)
    {
    if (value == string.Empty)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Popular");
    }
    else
    {
        Console.WriteLine(value);
    }
    }
}

which they then rewrite using overloads:

using System;

class Program
{
    public static void Main()
    {
    ShowString();
    ShowString("Category");
    }

    static void ShowString()
    {
    // Send default argument to overload.
    ShowString("Popular");
    }

    static void ShowString(string value)
    {
    // We don't need an if check here, which makes
    // ... calling this method directly faster.
    Console.WriteLine(value);
    }
}

Would using the overloads variant provide better performance results than using a method with a default parameter value?

like:

using System;

class Program
{
    public static void Main()
    {
    ShowString();
    ShowString("Category");
    }

    static void ShowString(string value = "Popular")
    {
    // We don't need an if check here, which makes
    // ... calling this method directly faster.
    Console.WriteLine(value);
    }
}

or is the last block of code the equivalent of the first block of code?

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Performance is very rarely the measure for language features. –  Henk Holterman Aug 11 '12 at 13:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

No, default parameters are at least as fast as overloads, because your last example compiles to:

....
ShowString("Popular");
ShowString("Category");
....

Your second example (using overloads) would (if built for Release instead of Debug) likely be inlined at runtime so that the performance would be the same as the last example (default parameters).

The example is kind of silly, since the cost of value == string.Empty is practically nothing, but I suppose it serves to illustrate the point. However, and this is probably the most important bit you should take from this answer: You should always go for clearer/more maintainable code before premature optimization, so usability should be the overriding factor in determining what you should use in a given situation.

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Thank you for the information and advice! –  IneedHelp Aug 11 '12 at 12:33

Overloading isn't necessarily about performance. In this case, the difference is minimal; the parameterless version is:

call, ldstr, call

The version with a parameter is (including the default-parameter version, regardless of whether a value is specified):

ldstr, call, ldarg_0, call

However, this will not impact performance; the only thing relevant to performance here is calling to the console, which is much slower than everything else.

Aka: don't worry about it unless you thiink there is an actual problem.

Overloading is more useful when specific methods allow optimised versions, for example to remove boxing.

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Thank you as well for the information. –  IneedHelp Aug 11 '12 at 12:33

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