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I came up with the below code to generate 100001 random strings.the strings should be unique. However, the below code takes hours to do the job. Can someone let me know how i can optimize it and why is it so slow?

string getRandomString(int length) {     
    static string charset = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";   
    string result;
    result.resize(length);
    for (int i = 0; i < length; i++) {
        result[i] = charset[rand() % charset.length()];   
    }
    return result; 
} 
void main(){

    srand(time(NULL));
    vector<string> storeUnigrams;
    int numUnigram = 100001; 
    string temp = "";
    int minLen = 3;
    int maxLen = 26;
    int range = maxLen - minLen + 1;
    int i =0;

    while(i < numUnigram){
        int lenOfRanString = rand()%range   + minLen;
        temp = getRandomString(lenOfRanString);
        bool doesithave = false;
        for(int j =0 ; j < storeUnigrams.size() ; j++){
            if(temp.compare(storeUnigrams[j]) == 0){
                doesithave = true;
                break;
            }
            if(temp.compare(storeUnigrams[j]) < 0){
                break;
            }
        }
        if(!doesithave){
            storeUnigrams.push_back(temp);
            sort(storeUnigrams.begin(),storeUnigrams.end());
            i++;
        }

    }
share|improve this question
2  
Why not just use libuuid? –  user529758 Aug 11 '12 at 12:59
2  
Why the c tag? –  Griwes Aug 11 '12 at 13:14

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

There are two factors that make your code slow:

  1. Checking by linear search whether the string already exists – O(n)
  2. Sorting the vector in each iteration – O(n log n)

Use e.g. a set for storing the strings – it's sorted automatically, and checking for existence is fast:

int main(){

    srand(time(NULL));
    set<string> storeUnigrams;
    int numUnigram = 100001; 
    int minLen = 3;
    int maxLen = 26;
    int range = maxLen - minLen + 1;

    while(storeUnigrams.size() < numUnigram){
        int lenOfRanString = rand()%range   + minLen;
        storeUnigrams.insert(getRandomString(lenOfRanString));
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Well, I was going to post a very similar code, so meh. But anyway, you should remove the vector and store things directly in the set. If OP just wants an ordered sequence of random strings, the std::set is the way to go. –  mfontanini Aug 11 '12 at 13:06
    
@mfontanini: Indeed, the vector can be eliminated in this case. –  Philipp Aug 11 '12 at 13:07
    
@Philipp: But doesn't keeping the set sorted also have an implicit O(nlogn) cost which offsets the O(nlogn) cost used by vectors? –  Programmer Aug 11 '12 at 18:03
1  
@Programmer: Inserting an element into a set has only O(log n) complexity. In your original algorithm, the total complexity is O(n² log n), my version has only O(n log n) (on average). –  Philipp Aug 11 '12 at 18:30
    
@Philipp : In my originial post, isn't the complexity O(n^2logn + n^2)? –  Programmer Aug 12 '12 at 8:38

This code generates a unique random number only once and stores it in random_once[i].

The first for loop generates ad stores the random number.

The second for loop is used to get the pre-rendered random numbers stored in the random_once[i] array.

Yes generating 100001 random numbers will take hours if not days.

#include <ctime>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;


int main()
{
      int numUnigram = 3001;
      int size=numUnigram;
      int random_once[100001];

      cout<<"Please wait: Generatng "<<numUnigram<<" random numbers   ";
      std::cout << '-' << std::flush;
      srand(time(0));



      for (int i=0;i<size;i++)  

      {

           //This code generates a unique random number only once
           //and stores it in random_once[i]

            random_once[i]=rand() % size;
            for(int j=0;j<i;j++) if (random_once[j]==random_once[i]) i--; 

            //loading animation  
            std::cout << "\b\\" << std::flush;
            std::cout << "\b|" << std::flush;
            std::cout << "\b/" << std::flush;
            std::cout << "\b-" << std::flush;

      }

      cout<<" \n";

      // this code dispays unique random numbers stored in random_once[i]
      for ( i=0;i<size;i++) cout<<" "<<random_once[i]<<"\t";
      cout<<" \n";

  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Philipp answer is fine. Another approach would be to use a Self-balancing Binary Search Tree like Red Black Tree instead of Vector. You can perform search and insets in log(n) time. If search is empty, insert the element.

share|improve this answer
    
Not the best solution since you are still sorting the whole vector during every iteration. Thus, you still have a cost of n^2logn + nlogn. Not good. –  Programmer Aug 11 '12 at 18:09
    
I'm not sorting whole vector. I'm inserting an element at a give index which I found using binary search. I guess it's n log n. In worst case n^2 –  Ankush Aug 11 '12 at 18:16
    
Well in order to use bs in the first place, the vector has to be sorted. How do you maintain this –  Programmer Aug 11 '12 at 18:18
    
vector is always in sorted order right from 1st insert. e.g. [3], 1 comes -> [1,3], 5 comes [1,3,5], 2 comes [1,2,3,5] so on. May be C++'s vector isn't the right structure to dynamically resize like linked list, but thats the idea. Inserts are constant time. –  Ankush Aug 11 '12 at 18:20
    
Well, let us say the vector is sorted and you want to insert an element in the beginning of the vector. I guess c++ does this by moving all the elements to the right and then inserting. This has a huge cost (O(n)) when compared to using a set (O(logn)). Thus, not good even though you use bs –  Programmer Aug 11 '12 at 18:22

Define your variables outside the while loop - because they are getting redefined at each iteration

int lenOfRanString = rand()%range   + minLen; ;
bool doesithave = false;

Update

Thought it's advised in many books, in practice with all the new compilers, this will not significantly improve the performance

share|improve this answer
3  
Well sure, you want them to be. Their values change for each loop iteration. The cost of "defining" them is insignificant. This won't make any difference. –  Cody Gray Aug 11 '12 at 12:58
    
@CodyGray but isn't filling up the stack an issue on the long run ? –  MimiEAM Aug 11 '12 at 13:02
    
No, this doesn't "fill up the stack". They're automatic variables, so they go out of scope at the curly brace that ends the loop. –  Cody Gray Aug 11 '12 at 13:03
    
@CodyGray ok, thank you –  MimiEAM Aug 11 '12 at 13:05
1  
Hmm, I actually don't have a copy of Code Complete 2, but you have to be careful to differentiate between variables that get reassigned each time the loop loops, and those whose values never change. If the values get assigned once at the beginning and then never change, then it is a useful optimization to pull them out of the loop. Sure, a good optimizing compiler will do this for you, but some might miss it. It makes good sense to do it yourself. But there's absolutely no benefit to extracting the declaration of a variable that is going to be reassigned a different value each iteration. –  Cody Gray Aug 11 '12 at 13:20

Use char arrays instead of strings (the string class does a lot of stuff behind the scenes)

share|improve this answer
3  
Like managing memory. You probably want that. You probably can't do a significantly better job by hand. –  Cody Gray Aug 11 '12 at 12:57
    
i was actually reffering to the [] operator that he uses quite a lot - and slows down his code quite a lot. Once the char arrays are generated he can make strings out of them for further use. The generation of the string itself should be faster with char arrays –  Gir Aug 11 '12 at 13:00
2  
How does the [] operator slow down his code? The [] operator doesn't even do bounds-checking for the std::string class (not that that should be relevant anyway). –  Cody Gray Aug 11 '12 at 13:02
    
i thought the [] operator does check for boundaries and allocates memory when needed. i guess it doesn't –  Gir Aug 11 '12 at 13:06
    
No, the [] operator is required to omit bounds checking precisely so that it doesn't slow down your code when you're using std::string like it were a character array. I'm not convinced it makes any difference, and I prefer the safety, but I didn't design the class. As far as allocating memory, yes, the std::string class allocates memory automatically as necessary, but there's no way for the [] operator to cause a memory allocation. The only thing you can access are elements that already exist. Even without bounds-checking, accessing an index that is out of range is undefined behavior. –  Cody Gray Aug 11 '12 at 13:13

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