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I have existing code on my computer, then I have registerd my account on sourceforge, starting a git project. Now I need to send my local project on sourceforge remote space. On sf there's the instruction page:

First time using Git

cd miorep-code
git init
git commit -a -m 'Initial commit'
git remote add origin ssh://****/p/miorep/code
git push origin master

Existing Repository

cd miorep-code
git remote add origin ssh://****/p/miorep/code
git push origin master

If I follow the first set of instructions, I have a

"Fatal: Paths with -a does not make sense"

when I get git commit -a -m 'Initial commit'.

If I follow the second set of instruction I get:

error: src refspec master does not match any. error: failed to push some refs to 'ssh://**/p/ravenna/code'

when I exec the last command.

What's the correct set of instructions in my case? Why I get that error?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The first set of instructions don't make sense:

cd miorep-code
git init
git commit -a -m 'Initial commit'

There needs to be a git add between git init and git commit, because otherwise git doesn't know what you want to commit. Your second error...

error: src refspec master does not match any. error: failed to push some refs to 'ssh://**/p/ravenna/code'

...means you haven't actually committed anything to your local repository yet, so there is no master branch to push.

What you want to do is:

cd miorep-code
git init
git add .
git commit -m 'initial commit'
git push origin master

You'll note that this is almost identical to your first set of instructions, except we've add a git add . which means "add everything in my current directory and below to my repository".

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It's seemed that remote add was needed. –  marianoc84 Aug 11 '12 at 15:23
1  
Yes; I was assuming you had already done that. –  larsks Aug 11 '12 at 15:58
    
Your answer seems wrong. git commit -a is supposed to be the equivalent of git add . && git commit. That's what the -a does, no?. –  Olhovsky May 15 '13 at 22:34
3  
No. git commit -a will commit all pending changes to files that are already part of the repository. git add . would add all files contained recursively in the current directory. In other words, git add . followed by git commit will add new files to the repository while git commit -a will just commit changes to existing files. –  larsks May 16 '13 at 15:42
3  
That seems like a terrible reason to downvote an answer, especially since you weren't the one who asked the question. You're welcome to ask a new question to get the answer you're looking for! –  larsks May 30 '14 at 11:45

The single-quote ' is the problem. Change it to double-quotes, like "initial commit". Use double-quotes in Windows-cmd instead of single-quote.

@AndrewC: read this before doing the downvote: http://git-scm.com/book/en/Git-Basics-Recording-Changes-to-the-Repository#Skipping-the-Staging-Area

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That won't work per the above comments, since nothing will be added to make a commit. –  Andrew C Oct 4 '14 at 0:31
    
I ran into the same problem yesterday. Change to double-quotes had helped. All untracked files, which manually copied to the git project folder, will automatically added to staged and then committed. -a option is a compound of the 2 actions. –  Tim Long Oct 4 '14 at 7:46
    
"every file that is already tracked" - there are no tracked files immediately after git init, per the above comments –  Andrew C Oct 4 '14 at 16:36
1  
In windows, change single-quote to double-quote would help to solve "Fatal: Paths with -a does not make sense". –  Tim Long Oct 5 '14 at 18:03

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