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I'm trying to find permutation of a given string, but I want to use iteration. The recursive solution I found online and I do understand it, but converting it to an iterative solution is really not working out. Below I have attached my code. I would really appreciate the help:

public static void combString(String s) {
    char[] a = new char[s.length()];
    //String temp = "";
    for(int i = 0; i < s.length(); i++) {
        a[i] = s.charAt(i);
    }
    for(int i = 0; i < s.length(); i++) {
        String temp = "" + a[i];    

        for(int j = 0; j < s.length();j++) {
            //int k = j;
            if(i != j) {
                System.out.println(j);
                temp += s.substring(0,j) + s.substring(j+1,s.length());
            }               
        }
        System.out.println(temp);
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
im really trying and i know my code is wrong..cant fix it!! – ueg1990 Aug 11 '12 at 13:22
    
You want to print all permutations of the string? It is not clear from the question. – Petr Pudlák Aug 11 '12 at 13:30
    
example if i have a string abc...other possiblities are: abc, acb,bac, bca,cab,cba – ueg1990 Aug 11 '12 at 13:33
1  
You might want to look at the answers to this related question – Don Roby Aug 11 '12 at 13:44
    
Please use the homework tag if this is school or university coursework. – Bobulous Aug 11 '12 at 15:42
up vote 10 down vote accepted

Following up on my related question comment, here's a Java implementation that does what you want using the Counting QuickPerm Algorithm:

public static void combString(String s) {
    // Print initial string, as only the alterations will be printed later
    System.out.println(s);   
    char[] a = s.toCharArray();
    int n = a.length;
    int[] p = new int[n];  // Weight index control array initially all zeros. Of course, same size of the char array.
    int i = 1; //Upper bound index. i.e: if string is "abc" then index i could be at "c"
    while (i < n) {
        if (p[i] < i) { //if the weight index is bigger or the same it means that we have already switched between these i,j (one iteration before).
            int j = ((i % 2) == 0) ? 0 : p[i];//Lower bound index. i.e: if string is "abc" then j index will always be 0.
            swap(a, i, j);
            // Print current
            System.out.println(join(a));
            p[i]++; //Adding 1 to the specific weight that relates to the char array.
            i = 1; //if i was 2 (for example), after the swap we now need to swap for i=1
        }
        else { 
            p[i] = 0;//Weight index will be zero because one iteration before, it was 1 (for example) to indicate that char array a[i] swapped.
            i++;//i index will have the option to go forward in the char array for "longer swaps"
        }
    }
}

private static String join(char[] a) {
    StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
    builder.append(a);
    return builder.toString();
}

private static void swap(char[] a, int i, int j) {
    char temp = a[i];
    a[i] = a[j];
    a[j] = temp;
}
share|improve this answer
    
isnt this too complicated?? – ueg1990 Aug 11 '12 at 16:05
1  
It's too complicated if you can come up with a simpler solution. Doing this is more complicated iteratively than recursively. – Don Roby Aug 11 '12 at 16:07
    
Stringbuilder as used here just converts the char array back to a string. – Don Roby Aug 11 '12 at 16:08
    
thanks alot!!!! – ueg1990 Aug 12 '12 at 5:13
4  
@DonRoby: this is an excellent solution. Though I traced it out with a sample input, I couldn't figure out the exact logic or how you approached this problem.. It would benefit us if you could explain us how you worked this out. Thanks. – Nike Feb 26 '13 at 9:05
    List<String> results = new ArrayList<String>();
    String test_str = "abcd";
    char[] chars = test_str.toCharArray();
    results.add(new String("" + chars[0]));
    for(int j=1; j<chars.length; j++) {
        char c = chars[j];
        int cur_size = results.size();
        //create new permutations combing char 'c' with each of the existing permutations
        for(int i=cur_size-1; i>=0; i--) {
            String str = results.remove(i);
            for(int l=0; l<=str.length(); l++) {
                results.add(str.substring(0,l) + c + str.substring(l));
            }
        }
    }
    System.out.println("Number of Permutations: " + results.size());
    System.out.println(results);

Example: if we have 3 character string e.g. "abc", we can form permuations as below.

1) construct a string with first character e.g. 'a' and store that in results.

    char[] chars = test_str.toCharArray();
    results.add(new String("" + chars[0]));

2) Now take next character in string (i.e. 'b') and insert that in all possible positions of previously contsructed strings in results. Since we have only one string in results ("a") at this point, doing so gives us 2 new strings 'ba', 'ab'. Insert these newly constructed strings in results and remove "a".

    for(int i=cur_size-1; i>=0; i--) {
        String str = results.remove(i);
        for(int l=0; l<=str.length(); l++) {
            results.add(str.substring(0,l) + c + str.substring(l));
        }
    }

3) Repeat 2) for every character in the given string.

for(int j=1; j<chars.length; j++) {
    char c = chars[j];
     ....
     ....
}

This gives us "cba", "bca", "bac" from "ba" and "cab", "acb" and "abc" from "ab"

share|improve this answer
2  
Please add some explanation. Code-only answers are not very helpful. Thanks. – Joshua Whitley Apr 17 '15 at 21:15
1  
Added explanation per comments. – Deeps Apr 17 '15 at 22:23
    
@Deeps what is the complexity of this algorithm? – Cyclotron3x3 Jun 26 '15 at 8:36
    
@Cyclotron3x3 you will go through 1 permutation of size 1 in first iteration, so create 2(=2!) permutations, 2 permutations in 2nd iteration of size 2, so create 6(=3!) permutations, 6 pemtuations of size 3 in 3rd iteration - so create ^*4=24=4! permutations..and in general k! permutations for each iteration. last iteration would be permutations of size n-1 - you have (n-1)! of those, you can add the last char in n places - so n! for last iteration. So the complexity would be O(Sum(k!) k=1..n) – Ron.B.I Nov 22 '15 at 22:36

Work queue allows us to create an elegant iterative solution for this problem.

static List<String> permutations(String string) {
    List<String> permutations = new LinkedList<>();
    Deque<WorkUnit> workQueue = new LinkedList<>(); 

    // We need to permutate the whole string and haven't done anything yet.
    workQueue.add(new WorkUnit(string, ""));

    while (!workQueue.isEmpty()) { // Do we still have any work?
        WorkUnit work = workQueue.poll();

        // Permutate each character.
        for (int i = 0; i < work.todo.length(); i++) {
            String permutation = work.done + work.todo.charAt(i);

            // Did we already build a complete permutation?
            if (permutation.length() == string.length()) {
                permutations.add(permutation);
            } else {

                // Otherwise what characters are left? 
                String stillTodo = work.todo.substring(0, i) + work.todo.substring(i + 1);
                workQueue.add(new WorkUnit(stillTodo, permutation));
            }
        }
    }
    return permutations; 
}

A helper class to hold partial results is very simple.

/**
 * Immutable unit of work
 */
class WorkUnit {
    final String todo;
    final String done;

    WorkUnit(String todo, String done) {
        this.todo = todo;
        this.done = done;
    }
}

You can test the above piece of code by wrapping them in this class.

import java.util.*;

public class AllPermutations {

    public static void main(String... args) {
        String str = args[0];
        System.out.println(permutations(str));
    }

    static List<String> permutations(String string) {
        ...
    }
}

class WorkUnit {
    ...
}

Try it by compiling and running.

$ javac AllPermutations.java; java AllPermutations abcd

The below implementation can also be easily tweaked to return a list of permutations in reverse order by using a LIFO stack of work instead of a FIFO queue.

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