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I have worked on Web services using Jaxb earlier. I geneated Java from xsd, and then I used to post the xml request to the specified URL using HTTP post. Recently I heard about this Restful web services, on reading I felt that what I had been doing earlier is the restful web service only. But, I am not sure about it if its the same thing. Can anyone explain please.

Thanks, Akshay

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2 Answers 2

It sounds like you have been creating the same types of RESTful services. You may be referring to is JAX-RS with is a standard that defines an easier way of creating RESTful services where JAXB is the standard binding layer for the application/xml media type. Below is an example service:

package org.example;

import java.util.List;

import javax.ejb.*;
import javax.persistence.*;
import javax.ws.rs.*;
import javax.ws.rs.core.MediaType;

@Stateless
@LocalBean
@Path("/customers")
public class CustomerService {

    @PersistenceContext(unitName="CustomerService",
                        type=PersistenceContextType.TRANSACTION)
    EntityManager entityManager;

    @POST
    @Consumes(MediaType.APPLICATION_XML)
    public void create(Customer customer) {
        entityManager.persist(customer);
    }

    @GET
    @Produces(MediaType.APPLICATION_XML)
    @Path("{id}")
    public Customer read(@PathParam("id") long id) {
        return entityManager.find(Customer.class, id);
    }

    @PUT
    @Consumes(MediaType.APPLICATION_XML)
    public void update(Customer customer) {
        entityManager.merge(customer);
    }

    @DELETE
    @Path("{id}")
    public void delete(@PathParam("id") long id) {
        Customer customer = read(id);
        if(null != customer) {
            entityManager.remove(customer);
        }
    }

}

For More Information

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When it comes to say 'RESTful', it's just an convention of HTTP methods and url patterns.

CRUD   METHOD   URL                         RESPONSE DESCRIPTION
----------------------------------------------------------------
CREATE POST     http://www.doma.in/people   202      Creates a new person with given entity body
READ   GET      http://www.doma.in/people   200
READ   GET      http://www.doma.in/people/1 200 404  Reads a single person
UPDATE PUT      http://www.doma.in/people/2 204      Updates a single person with given entity body
DELETE DELETE   http://www.doma.in/people/1 204      Deletes a person mapped to given id(1)

You can even implement those kind of contracts with Sevlets. Actually I had done with Sevlets before the era of JAX-RS.

And your life will be much more easier when you use JAX-RS.

Here comes a slightly modified version of Mr. Blaise Doughan's. Nothing's wrong with Mr. Blaise Doughan's code.

I just want to add more for above url patterns.

One of great things that JAX-RS can offer is that you can serve XMLs and JSONs as clients want if you have those fine JAXB classes. See @Producess and @Consumess for those two formats in same method.

When client want to receive as XML with Accept: application/xml, they just get the XML.

When client want to receive as JSON with Accept: application/json, they just get the JSON.

@Path("/customers");
public class CustomersResource {

    /**
     * Reads all person units.
     */
    @POST
    @Produces({MediaType.APPLICATION_XML, MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON})
    public Response read() {
        final List<Customer> listed = customerBean.list();
        final Customers wrapped = Customers.newInstance(listed);
        return Response.ok(wrapped).build();
    }

    @POST
    @Consumes({MediaType.APPLICATION_XML, MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON})
    public Response createCustomer(final Customer customer) {
        entityManager.persist(customer);
        return Response.created("/" + customer.getId()).build();
    }

    @GET
    @Produces({MediaType.APPLICATION_XML, MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON})
    @Path("/{id: \\d+}")
    public Response read(@PathParam("id") final long id) {
        final Customer customer = entityManager.find(Customer.class, id);
        if (customer == null) {
            return Response.status(Status.NOT_FOUND).build();
        }
        return Response.ok(customer).build();
    }

    @PUT
    @Consumes({MediaType.APPLICATION_XML, MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON})
    public void updateCustomer(final Customer customer) {
        entityManager.merge(customer);
    }

    @DELETE
    @Path("/{id: \\d+}")
    public void deleteCustomer(@PathParam("id") final long id) {
        final Customer customer = entityManager.find(Customer.class, id);
        if (customer != null) {
            entityManager.remove(customer);
        }
        return Response.status(Status.NO_CONTENT).build();
    }
}

Say you want to serve some images?

@GET
@Path("/{id: \\d+}")
@Produces({"image/png", "image/jpeg"})
public Response readImage(
    @HeaderParam("Accept") String accept,
    @PathParam("id") final long id,
    @QueryParam("width") @DefaultValue("160") final int width,
    @QueryParam("height") @DefaultValue("160") final int height) {

    // get the image
    // resize the image
    // make a BufferedImage for accept(MIME type)
    // rewrite it to an byte[]
    return Response.ok(bytes).build();

    // you can event send as a streaming outout
    return Response.ok(new StreamingOutput(){...}).build();
}
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