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What I would like is to end up with something like:

public class InterleavedBufferedReader extends BufferedReader {
...
}

And use it as:

Reader[3] readers = ...; // three readers
InterleavedBufferedReader ibr = new InterleavedBufferedReader(readers);

ibr.readLine();  // this returns the first line of Reader 1
ibr.readLine();  // this returns the first line of Reader 2
ibr.readLine();  // this returns the first line of Reader 3

ibr.readLine();  // this returns the second line of Reader 1
ibr.readLine();  // this returns the second line of Reader 2
ibr.readLine();  // hey, Reader 3 had no more lines, return the third line of Reader 1

What I tried (no good, I know, that's why I'm here):

public class InterleavedBufferedReader extends BufferedReader {

    static private int current = 0;
    private BufferedReader[] buffers;


    public InterleavedBufferedReader(BufferedReader[] in) {
        super(new StringReader("dummy"));
        buffers = in;
    }

    public InterleavedBufferedReader(Reader[] in) {
        super(new StringReader("dummy"));
        buffers = new BufferedReader[in.length];
        for (int i=0 ; i < in.length ; i++)
            buffers[i] = new BufferedReader(in[i]);
    }

    @Override
    public String readLine() throws IOException {
        int start = current;
        String line = null;
        while ((line = buffers[current].readLine()) == null) {
            current = (current+1) % buffers.length;
            if (current == start)
                return null;
        }       
        current = (current+1) % buffers.length;
        return line;

    }

    @Override 
    public void close() throws IOException {
        for (int i=0;  i < buffers.length; i++)
            buffers[i].close();
    }
}

Comments:

  • The interleaved readLine() actually works!
  • Perhaps I shouldn't be extending BufferedReader. I'm forced to give it a dummy Reader to manage, or it won't even compile. Meanwhile, I override the readLine() method to call it on the children readers. But the implementation is at least incomplete, because other methods, as read(), will actually refer to my dummy reader.

I can I do this in a cleaner way?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Perhaps I shouldn't be extending BufferedReader. I'm forced to give it a dummy Reader to manage, or it won't even compile. [...] the implementation is at least incomplete, because other methods, as read(), will actually refer to my dummy reader

You can, and should, override read() (and ready()) as well. That implementation of readLine() would have to be kept, but at least you are sure that all reading methods are compliant to the interleaving that you wish to achieve. The dummy reader cannot be avoided, but your implementation can. You might even want to set the buffer of the BufferedReader to the lowest value you can (1), to reduce memory waste.

Other than that, you must not forget about the marking support of the stream: you must either reimplement it by overriding mark() and reset(), or just override markSupported() so that it always returns false.

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Thanks @E_net4 , that is useful input. Indeed, implementing read() (and others) is necessary. Actually, supposing that I could implement read() correctly (that it can read from all buffers, but without breaking lines), then I could even extend only Reader and create a simple BufferedReader on top to get the correct readLine() functionality. Unfortunately, I haven't managed yet to implement this read() correctly :( –  cornuz Aug 11 '12 at 19:17
    
With read() I of course mean read(char[], int, int), not the single-char read(). –  cornuz Aug 11 '12 at 19:23
    
Sure, implementing read() is the most important, but there's a chance you might need to implement read(char[], int, int) as well. It depends on how the BufferedReader is implemented, and one should better stay safe. –  E_net4 Aug 11 '12 at 20:09
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I'm answering my own question, after the useful comments above, to show the solution I found and that seems to work. I'm not sure it's 100% correct (not tested what would happen with lines that are longer than the buffer).

Differences with the first version:

  • It extends Reader, not BufferedReader. It is simpler, and no need for a dummy reader. By making sure its children are BufferedReader, it can call readLine() on them.
  • it still implements a readLine() which gives the functionality I was looking for
  • read(char[], int, int) is implemented using the readLine() above. That way, I'm sure lines are never broken. This is needed with, for example, new LineNumberReader(new InterleavedReader(...)).readLine(), which calls read(char[], int, int) on InterleavedReader.

Here is the code. Please, let me know if you can suggest improvements!

public class InterleavedReader extends Reader {

    private int current = 0;
    private BufferedReader[] buffers = null;
    private boolean skipLF = false;

    public InterleavedReader(Reader[] in) {
        super();
        buffers = new BufferedReader[in.length];
        for (int i=0 ; i < in.length ; i++) {
            if (in[i] instanceof BufferedReader)
                buffers[i] = (BufferedReader) in[i];
            else
                buffers[i] = new BufferedReader(in[i]);         
        }
    }

    public String readLine() throws IOException {
        // Every time, we issue readLine() to the next child BuffredReader
        // If we make a complete loop without a valid line,
        // then no child has more lines
        synchronized (lock) {
            int start = current;
            String line = null;
            while ((line = buffers[current].readLine()) == null) {
                current = (current+1) % buffers.length;
                if (current == start)
                    return null;
            }       
            current = (current+1) % buffers.length;
            return line;
        }
    }

    @Override
    public int read(char cbuf[], int off, int len) throws IOException {
        // To be sure we never break a line, we implement this using readLine()
        String s = readLine();
        if (s == null)
            return -1;
        System.arraycopy(s.toCharArray(), 0, cbuf, off, s.length());
        // readLine() doesn't include the '\n', append it to the buffer
        cbuf[off+s.length()] = '\n';
        return s.length()+1;
    }


    private int readChar() throws IOException {
        int start = current;
        int c = -1;
        while ((c = buffers[current].read()) == -1) {
            current = (current+1) % buffers.length;
            if (current == start)
                return -1;
        }   
        return c;
    }

    @Override
    public int read() throws IOException {
        synchronized (lock) {
            int c = readChar();
            if (skipLF && c == '\n') {
                c = readChar();
                skipLF = false;
            }
            switch (c) {
            case '\r':
                skipLF = true;
            case '\n':          /* Fall through */
                current = (current+1) % buffers.length;
                return '\n';
            }           
            return c;
        }
    }

    @Override
    public boolean markSupported() {
        return false;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean ready() throws IOException {
        synchronized (lock) {
            for(int i=0; i < buffers.length; i++)
                if (buffers[i].ready())
                    return true;
            return false;
        }
    }

    @Override 
    public void close() throws IOException {
        synchronized (lock) {
            for (int i=0;  i < buffers.length; i++)
                buffers[i].close();
        }
    }
}    
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