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I 'm reading the protocol specification that it explain byte 0 : 0b0000001x if line Available. So, i must create packet according to this doc.But i don't know how to assign 0b0000001x to the variable in C. I have :

unsigned char * payload;
payload[0] = 0b0000001x;

But i get the following error:

error: unable to find numeric literal operator ‘operator"" x0’
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0b0000001x is not a valid numeric expression in C. In your specification it most likely means "this is a binary number, i.e. a sequence of bits", and x is the bit you should set or clear according to the current state of the line. If I'm reading this correctly and the endianness is correct, the resulting byte value should be (2 + (is_line_available ? 1 : 0)). (Also, you are not allocating any space for payload and so you'll write into random memory.) –  DCoder Aug 11 '12 at 14:29
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@DCoder: +1 post that as an answer –  Aziz Aug 11 '12 at 14:30
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2 Answers

It looks like C doesn't support binary literals. Try using hex instead.

payload[0] = 0x01;
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0b0000001x is not a valid numeric expression in C or C++.

In your specification it most likely means "this is a binary number, i.e. a sequence of bits", and x is the bit you should set or clear according to the current state of the line. Unfortunately, C and C++ do not support binary literals, so you need to compute the value manually.

If I'm reading this correctly and the endianness is correct, the resulting byte value should be:

payload[0] = 2 + (is_line_available ? 1 : 0);

Also, you are not allocating any space for payload and so you'll write into random memory. You need to allocate some memory:

Static allocation, works in both C and C++:

unsigned char payload[24]; // or whatever your message's length is

C-style dynamic allocation (make sure to free it after you're done):

unsigned char *payload = malloc(24);
...; 
free(payload);

C++ recommended approach:

#include <vector>
std::vector<unsigned char> payload;
payload.reserve(24);
...;
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