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In my website, I am trying to get the rollover effects working.
Currently, on no mouse hover, the ul li item is displayed as text but on mouse hover, it has a rollover effect to show the image.

Instead of having text in the normal mouse non-hover state, I want to have images.
That means, mouse hover and non-mouse hover are both different images, and there's no text
I wanted to ask how do I get such a rollover effect working, in contrast to what I have currently. (non-mouse hover is text which I want to to change to images as well)

Here is the jsfiddle of how I currently have rollovers: http://jsfiddle.net/PF35v/7/

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Please consider posting a live demo of this, to show us what you're working with (and how it works), at JS Fiddle, JS Bin, or similar. –  David Thomas Aug 11 '12 at 15:04
    
@DavidThomas: Added to the post –  user1372448 Aug 11 '12 at 15:18
    
I still don't understand what you want; you want the text to be hidden and which images to be shown without :hover? That's completely unclear in your example. –  Jared Farrish Aug 11 '12 at 15:28
    
@JaredFarrish: Editted and rephrased the question –  user1372448 Aug 11 '12 at 15:35
    
Does this example approximate the effect you're describing? jsfiddle.net/RdRcj –  Jared Farrish Aug 11 '12 at 15:40

2 Answers 2

You have all of the images hidden by default so when you put an image inside the a tag, it is also hidden.

ul#nav li a img { display: block; }

This will make the images in links always visible but the others hidden by default. I think that's what you're asking for.

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Editted and rephrased the question. Looks like it was a bit unclear earlier. I hope it conveys right now –  user1372448 Aug 11 '12 at 15:34
    
Yes thats what I thought. Try it. –  sachleen Aug 11 '12 at 15:38

Here's two different approaches, I'm sure there are others:

HTML-Centric

<ul id="nav">
    <li>
        <a href="#">
            <span>My Text</span>
            <img src="http://goo.gl/tYsDU"/>
            <img class="hover" src="http://goo.gl/UohAz"/>
        </a>
    </li>
    ...
</ul>

#nav,
#nav li {
    list-style-type: none;
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
}
#nav li a img {
    display: inline;
}
#nav li a img.hover,
#nav li a span {
    display: none;
}
#nav li a:hover img {
    display: none;
}
#nav li a:hover img.hover {
    display: inline;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/RdRcj/1

CSS-Centric

<ul id="nav">
    <li>
        <a href="#" alt="My Text"></a>
    </li>
    ...
</ul>

#nav,
#nav li {
    list-style-type: none;
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
}
#nav li {
    width: 128px;
    height: 128px;
    background-image: url(http://goo.gl/tYsDU);
}
#nav li a {
    display: block;
    width: 128px;
    height: 128px;
    padding: 0;
}
#nav li a:hover {
    background-image: url(http://goo.gl/UohAz);
}

http://jsfiddle.net/RdRcj/

The first is probably the "best" from a flexibility standpoint; you don't have to hard-bake the dimensions in like you do the second. However, if they're unchanging, perhaps the second is preferable for your approach, it just takes targeting each li and a specifically, which can prove a little brittle.

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