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Is this valid C++ (considering the latest standard)? I'm getting compilation errors with near-top-of-tree clang/libc++ on Ubuntu 12.04. If it should be valid, I'll mail the clang-dev list with error messages and such.

#include <functional>
#include <unordered_set>

struct X
{
    int i; 
};

void f ()
{
    std::unordered_set<std::reference_wrapper<X>> setOfReferencesToX;

    // Do stuff with setOfReferencesToX
}

** As an aside, I'm tired of qualifying that the question/answer is specific to the latest standard. Could the C++ community as a whole, please start qualifying things that are specific to the old standard instead? The newer standard has been out for about a year now.

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1  
+1 for the end note. –  Griwes Aug 11 '12 at 16:07
    
"Could the C++ community as a whole, please start qualifying things that are specific to the old standard instead?" No. Given the sheer number of users who are not able to upgrade to a compiler with more complete C++11 support, let alone the popularity of a certain compiler family that is only slowly upgrading it's C++11 support, C++ is going to mean C++03 for at least another year if not two. And lets not forget that neither GCC nor Clang claims full conformance to C++11. The future is not the present, and pretending that it is will not make it so. –  Nicol Bolas Aug 11 '12 at 20:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The problem is not specific to std::reference_wrapper<T>, but rather to the type X itself.

The issue is that std::unordered_set requires that you define hashing and equality functors for std::reference_wrapper<X>. You can pass the hash functor as second template parameter.

For example, this would work:

#include <functional> // for std::hash<int>

struct HashX {
  size_t operator()(const X& x) const {
    return std::hash<int>()(x.i);      
  }
};

and then

std::unordered_set<std::reference_wrapper<X>, HashX> setOfReferencesToX;

Another option is to make a specialization for std::hash<X>:

namespace std {
template <>
struct hash<X> {
  size_t operator()(const X& x) const {
    return std::hash<int>()(x.i);      
  }
};
}

This allows you to avoid explicitly specifying the 2nd template argument:

std::unordered_set<std::reference_wrapper<X>> setOfReferencesToX;

Concerning the equality comparison, you can fix this by providing an equality operator for class X:

struct X
{
  bool operator==(const X& rhs) const { return i == rhs.i; }
  int i; 
};

Otherwise, you can define your own functor and pass it as third template argument.

share|improve this answer
    
Wouldn't specializing std::hash be a bit simpler? –  Griwes Aug 11 '12 at 16:08
    
It would, if you are willing to put stuff in the std namespace. –  juanchopanza Aug 11 '12 at 16:10
    
I don't think it should be qualified as "putting stuff in std", as it's mere specialization... –  Griwes Aug 11 '12 at 16:11
    
@Griwes OK, I added an example doing just that. It is what I normally do, but I am not sure whether it is frowned upon or not :-) –  juanchopanza Aug 11 '12 at 16:14
    
Your last example does need to use std::hash<X> explicitly as the hasher, otherwise it will defer to std::hash<std::reference_wrapper<X>>. –  Luc Danton Aug 12 '12 at 18:56

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