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I have been reading an array of SRD objects from a binary file - but since this was my first time doing so, I have modified a header making all its members public as I wasn't sure what would be going on. I have completed my assignment, all that is left is to make these members private and write methods that modify them. However, there is a problem. For debugging purposes I put only 1 member private, and until I write all methods for it I will keep it that way. This member is simply an unsigned int C. When writing a method for returning it (getC() returns C), it is returning a value of 0000...3435973836, meaning it is not set? So, I have an array of pointers to SRD created based on the number of objects in the binary file.

SRD *a;
...
a = new SRD[numOfRecords];

and the array is filled from the file...

for (i=0; i<numOfRecords; i++)
    {
        f.seekg(i * sizeof s);  
        f.read((char *)&a[i], sizeof s);
        cout << a[i].getCC();
    }

now, a[i].getCC() works when C is public, but making it private makes 000..3435... meaning accessing it is not the problem, but it is not set in the fread from the previous for loop. I imagine I need some type of assignment operator, that sets these values, but I have no clue...

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2 Answers 2

When you make the variable private, the SRD class is no longer plain old data (POD). Consequently, you have no guarantees regarding its in-memory representation, and therefore you cannot rely on f.read to work like this any longer.

I suggest that you add a read-from-stream method in your class and inside that method, read directly to the unsigned int member variable. Then, in the loop, you just call that method (passing the stream as a reference or a pointer).

EDIT, example as requested:

class SRD {
  ...
  public:
    void readFromStream(istream& f) {
      f.read(&CC, sizeof CC);
    }
  private:
    unsigned int CC;
};

Loop:

for (i=0; i<numOfRecords; i++)
{
    a[i].readFromStream(f);
    cout << a[i].getCC();
}
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can you write a simple example, say simply a 1 member class on how to do this? –  user1479059 Aug 11 '12 at 19:17
    
Example added, hope it helps. –  Pukku Aug 11 '12 at 20:27
    
Actually, the problem was something else: the header was defined in a certain order, the first member was an array, while C was the second, and while debugging i first started with the C - and moving it from the second position to the above public one, changed the structure of the class. so, Class P { int i; char c; } differs from Class P { char c; int i; } because the data in the binary file has a specific order, and when rearranging the order of the class defenition, a member (c) tries to access data intended for another member (i) –  user1479059 Aug 12 '12 at 1:53

Actually, the problem was something else: the header was defined in a certain order, the first member was an array, while C was the second, and while debugging i first started with the C - and moving it from the second position to the above public one, changed the structure of the class.

so,

Class P
{
int i;
char c;
}

differs from

Class P
{
char c;
int i;
}

because the data in the binary file has a specific order, and when rearranging the order of the class defenition, a member (c) tries to access data intended for another member (i)

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