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STL queue has front() and back() methods, but stack has only top(), but not bottom(). Why is that so?

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Pedantic note, queue and stack are not containers. –  juanchopanza Aug 11 '12 at 20:00
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Because it's a stack. It's intentionally limited to last-in, first-out access, because that's how a stack is defined. A queue is first-in, first-out, so you need access to both ends. –  Jerry Coffin Aug 11 '12 at 20:01
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You could just as easily add that list has push_back and push_front, but vector has push_back only. In this case the reason is the efficiency with which you can implement the operation. –  jahhaj Aug 11 '12 at 20:03
    
@jahhaj: That's different – list and vector are containers, and the operations they support depend on the algorithmic complexity necessary for the operations. On the other hand, queue and stack are container adaptors – they are designed to have a very limited interface. –  Philipp Aug 11 '12 at 20:04
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I guess the question is "why does queue have a back() method and no method that allows you to remove that element from the back". –  juanchopanza Aug 11 '12 at 20:11

2 Answers 2

The only reason for stack is to prohibit access to the wrapped container except as a stack, i.e. accessing the top only. If you want a container that can be used as a stack but which is not restricted to only working as a stack, then you can use a different sequence container, such as a raw vector.

Similarly, the only reason for queue is to prohibit access to the wrapped container except as a queue, i.e. accessing the front and back. If you want a container that can be used as a queue but which is not restricted to only working as a queue, then you can use a different sequence container, such as a raw vector.

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A queue typically represents a first in first out (FIFO) buffer. You can access both ends. One end has the most recent item and the other end has the oldest item. You might want to access the most recent item from the code that is adding elements to the queue and the oldest item from code that processes items from the queue.

A stack typically represents a last in first out (LIFO) buffer. You can only access one end, which is the most recent item added to the stack. So there only needs to be a top(), and no bottom().

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