Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I was reading that there are many reasons for making a class final in SO threads and also in an arcticle Two of which were

1. To remove extensibility
2. to make class immutable.

Does making a class immutable have the characteristic along with it as being final ( it's methods )? I don't see the difference between the two?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Immutable object does not allow to change his state. Final class does not allow to inherit itself. For example class Foo (see below) is immutable (the state, ie _name is never changed ) and class Bar is mutable (rename method allows to change the state):

final class Foo
{
  private String _name;

  public Foo(string name)
  {
    _name = name;
  }

  public String getName()
  {
    return _name;
  }
}

final class Bar
{
  private String _name;

  public Bar(string name)
  {
    _name = name;
  }

  public String getName()
  {
    return _name;
  }

  public void rename(string newName)
  {
    _name = newName;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I want to do this just to pun yout name... @ie. I.E. it's like having a C++ class like this: class foo { private: int a; public: b(int c) const { return a; } } –  Chris Okyen Aug 11 '12 at 20:46
    
For immutable... –  Chris Okyen Aug 11 '12 at 20:48
    
@ChrisOkyen I've added a sample that shows the difference –  ie. Aug 11 '12 at 20:54
    
Thank you so much!!!! –  Chris Okyen Aug 12 '12 at 1:47
1  
@ChrisOkyen year, you right final helps you to have immutable classes, but it is not only what final was designed for –  ie. Aug 12 '12 at 9:32

It can sometimes be useful to recognize types as "verifiably deeply immutable", meaning that static analysis can demonstrate that (1) once an instance is constructed, none of its properties will ever change, and (2) every object instance to which it holds a reference is verifiably deeply immutable. Classes which are open to extension cannot be verifiably deeply immutable, because a static analyzer would have no way of knowing whether a mutable subclass might be created, and a reference to that mutable subclass stored within what's supposed to be a verifiably deeply immutable object.

On the other hand, it can sometimes be useful to have abstract (and thus extensible) classes which are specified to be deeply immutable. The abstract class would have no way of forcing derived classes to immutable, but any mutable derived classes should be considered "broken". The situation would be somewhat analogous to the requirement that two object instances which report themselves as "equal" to each other should report the same hash code. It's possible to design classes which violate that requirement, but any errant hash-table behavior that results is the fault of the broken hash-code function, rather than the hash table.

For example, one might have an abstract ImmutableMatrix property with a method to read the element at a given (row,column) location. One possible implementation would be to back an NxM ImmutableMatrix with an array of N*M elements. On the other hand, it may also be useful to define some subclasses like ImmutableDiagonalMatrix, with an array of N elements, where Value(R,C) would yield 0 for R!=C, and Arr[R] for R==C. If a significant fraction of the arrays one is using will be diagonal arrays, one could save a lot of memory for each such instance. While leaving the class extensible would leave open the possibility that someone might extend it in a fashion which is open to mutation, it would also leave open the possibility that a programmer who knew that many of the arrays a program used would fit some particular form could design a class to optimally store that form.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.